Employer Sponsored Health Insurance

In the United States and other countries that do not have national health systems, employers often offer health insurance as a benefit to employees. RAND has examined how employer-sponsored health insurance impacts economic and social factors such as entrepreneurs and small businesses, national-level health care costs, industry economic performance, and labor market conditions.

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Do Workplace Wellness Programs Reduce Medical Costs? Evidence from a Fortune 500 Company

    The recent passage of the Affordable Care Act has heightened the importance of workplace wellness programs. This paper used administrative data from 2002 to 2007 for PepsiCo's self-insured plan members to evaluate the effect of its wellness program on medical costs and utilization.

    May 1, 2013

  • couple discussing their finances

    Commentary

    Health Care Cost Growth Is Hurting Middle-Class Families

    Unfortunately, nearly every actor in our health care delivery system—hospitals, physicians, other health care providers, insurance companies, and the manufacturers of drugs and devices—is currently focused on maximizing revenue growth, write Arthur Kellermann and David Auerbach.

    Jan 8, 2013

  • dollar sign and a stethoscope

    Commentary

    Health Care Costs Are Killing Us

    At a time when our country is teetering on the edge of a “fiscal cliff,” no challenge in health care is more important than reducing health care spending, writes Arthur L. Kellermann.

    Jan 4, 2013

  • Arkansas flag

    Report

    The Economic Impact of the ACA on Arkansas

    For Arkansas, the Affordable Care Act will result in an increase in GDP of around $550 million and the creation of about 6,200 jobs. The new law will also increase health insurance coverage by 400,000 newly insured individuals.

    Jan 3, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Modeling Employer Self-Insurance Decisions After the Affordable Care Act

    Self-insurance rates will increase among small firms only under the hypothetical situation that generous stop-loss policies are available to them after implementation of the ACA. Even if many small firms choose to self insure under this situation, it will not increase the premiums charged in the insurance exchanges by more than a few tenths of a percent.

    Jan 1, 2013

  • health insurance form

    Research Brief

    Engage and Empower Consumers to Contain Health Care Spending

    Cost-sharing leads consumers to reduce both highly beneficial and less beneficial care, so they must be empowered with useful information to make informed decisions. Public cost and quality reports must be accurate, accessible, and understandable.

    Nov 15, 2012

  • checking blood pressure at work

    Commentary

    Will More Employers Drop Coverage Under the ACA? Don't Bet on It

    A problem with using surveys to predict behavior is that they measure employer sentiment toward the ACA today, rather than the economic decisions employers typically make when the time comes, writes Art Kellermann.

    Jul 27, 2012

  • pills and money

    Research Brief

    Consumer-Directed Plans Could Cut Health Costs Sharply, but Also Discourage Preventive Care

    Switching to a consumer-directed health plan (CDHP) could save families 20 percent or more on their health care costs. Families with CDHPs initiate less episodes of care and spend less per episode, however, they also tend to scale back on high-value preventive care, such as child vaccinations.

    Jun 28, 2012

  • A calculator that says healthcare on top of U.S. currency

    Blog

    Expanding Consumer-Directed Health Plans Could Help Cut Overall Health Care Spending

    If consumer-directed health plans grow to account for half of all employer-sponsored insurance in the United States, health costs could drop by $57 billion annually—about 4 percent of all health care spending among the nonelderly.

    Jun 1, 2012

  • Employee benefits paperwork

    Blog

    Would the Affordable Care Act Lead to Reductions in Employer-Sponsored Coverage?

    As the U.S. Supreme Court considers the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) individual mandate, one of the questions being debated is what effect the mandate would have on employer-sponsored health insurance coverage. A factor to consider in this is the effect the ACA would have on small businesses, which employ the majority of America's private-sector workforce.

    May 4, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Expanding Consumer-Directed Health Plans Could Help Cut Overall Health Care Spending

    If consumer-directed health plans grow to account for half of all employer-sponsored insurance in the United States, health costs could drop by $57 billion annually—about 4 percent of all health care spending among the nonelderly.

    May 1, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Do Small-Group Health Insurance Regulations Influence Small Business Size?

    State small-group health insurance reforms, implemented in the 1990s, aimed at controlling the variability of health insurance premiums and to improve access to health insurance. These reforms only affected firms within a specific size range, and as a result, they may have affected the size of small firms around the legislative threshold and may also have affected the propensity of small firms to offer health insurance.

    Mar 1, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Impacts of Rising Health Care Costs on Families with Employment-Based Private Insurance: A National Analysis with State Fixed Effects

    Rising health costs reduce employment-based private insurance availability and enrollment, and the financial protection provided by it, especially for middle-class families.

    Jan 1, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Medical Expenditure Risk and Household Portfolio Choice

    Ownership of risky assets rises as the risk of medical expenditure decreases. Medigap or employer supplemental insurance increases risky asset holding by about 7 percentage points. Belonging to a Medicare HMO increases risky asset holding by 13 percentage points.

    Jan 1, 2012

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Use of Retail Medical Clinics Rises Tenfold Over Two-Year Period

    Use of retail medical clinics located in pharmacies and other retail settings increased tenfold between 2007 and 2009. The determining factors in choosing one over a physician's office were found to be age, health status, income, and proximity to the clinic.

    Nov 1, 2011

  • News Release

    News Release

    Consumers May Have More Control Over Health Care Costs Than Previously Thought

    The historic RAND Health Insurance Experiment found that patients had little or no control over their health care spending once they began to receive a physician's care, but this has changed for those enrolled in consumer-directed health plans.

    Sep 29, 2011

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Accelerating Health Care Costs Wiping Out Much of Americans' Income Gains

    Fast-rising health care costs have eaten nearly all the income gains made by a median-income American family of four over the past decade, leaving them with just $95 per month in extra income, after accounting for taxes and price increases.

    Sep 8, 2011

  • News Release

    News Release

    Accelerating Health Care Costs Wiping Out Much of Americans' Income Gains

    Fast-rising health care costs have eaten nearly all the income gains made by a median-income American family of four over the past decade, leaving them with just $95 per month in extra income, after accounting for taxes and price increases.

    Sep 7, 2011

  • Periodical

    Periodical

    Beyond the Shadow of 9/11

    The 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks warrants a thoughtful review of America's progress and future strategy. In this RAND Review cover story, RAND experts offer perspectives on Afghan-led solutions, ways to counter al Qaeda, air passenger security, and compensation for those affected by terrorism.

    Sep 1, 2011

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    A Decade of Health Care Cost Growth Has Wiped Out Real Income Gains for an Average US Family

    This article translates aggregate numbers about health spending into concrete measures that consumers can relate to.

    Sep 1, 2011