Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship—creating emerging sectors and new businesses to foster economic development—is a vital driver of the global economy. RAND research on U.S. entrepreneurship explores how public policy affects start-up businesses, from the impact of the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002 to the problems posed by the U.S. employer-based health care system; worldwide, RAND research has focused on international trade and entrepreneurship in developing countries.

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    Kathryn Connor

    Adjunct Policy Researcher
    Education M.P.P., University of Chicago; B.A. in economics, Baylor University

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    Susan M. Gates

    Director, Office of Research Quality Assurance; Senior Economist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in economic analysis and policy, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Stanford University; M.A. in Russian and Eastern European studies, Stanford University; A.B. in mathematical economics, Brown University

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    Shanthi Nataraj

    Director, Labor and Workforce Development Program; Senior Economist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics, University of California, Berkeley; B.S. in environmental engineering, Northwestern University

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    Troy D. Smith

    Associate Economist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in economics, Stanford University

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    Christina E. Steiner

    Assistant Policy Researcher
    Education Ph.D. in policy analysis, Pardee RAND Graduate School; M.B.A. in strategic marketing, University of Texas; B.A. in economics and Spanish, Wellesley College

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    Douglas Yeung

    Behavioral and Social Scientist; Faculty Member, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in psychology, Rutgers University; B.S. in management science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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