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  • Senior woman using digital tablet and having video call with nurse, photo by izusek/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Primary Care Networks in a Time of Pandemic

    Primary care networks in the UK bring together general practices and community providers to develop new services for patients and to provide better integration of health and social care services and sustainability in primary care. While still relatively new, their trajectory is likely to be influenced by COVID-19–related adaptations they have made over the course of the pandemic.

    Nov 11, 2020

  • Blog

    'Internet of Bodies,' COVID-19 as a Preexisting Condition, Preventive Health Care: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on the potential risks and benefits of the 'Internet of Bodies,' what might happen if the ACA is struck down and COVID-19 is considered a preexisting condition, a drop in the use of preventive care, and more.

    Nov 6, 2020

  • Empty medical office waiting room, photo by creativeneko/Getty Images

    News Release

    Preventive Health Care Dropped Significantly During First Two Months of Pandemic Lockdown; Study Finds Disparities in Switch to Telemedicine

    During the first two months of the pandemic lockdown, Americans dramatically reduced their use of preventive and elective health care, while increasing use of telemedicine—but the switch was not enough to offset reductions in in-person care.

    Nov 5, 2020

  • A nurse prepares to inject a potential COVID-19 vaccine into a human patient, photo by PordeeStudio/Adobe Stock.

    Research Brief

    Unequal Access to COVID-19 Vaccines Would Further Damage the Global Economy

    As long as the coronavirus is not under control in all regions of the world there will continue to be a global economic cost associated with COVID-19. Vaccine nationalism could cost up to $1.2 trillion a year in GDP. If the poorest countries cannot access vaccines, the loss would be between $60 and $340 billion a year.

    Nov 5, 2020

  • The principal at Phoebe A. Hearst Elementary School hands a laptop to a student's parent in Sacramento, Calif., April 10, 2020, photo by Rich Pedroncelli/AP

    Essay

    How Schools Adjusted to Life Under COVID-19

    In spring 2020, nearly every school in America had to figure out how to make distance learning work. Some handed out thick packets of homework for students to do on their own. Others handed out laptops. Most principals agree that better planning for future closures should be a priority.

    Nov 2, 2020

  • Blog

    'Vaccine Nationalism,' a Pandemic Election, Women in the Workforce: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on why 'vaccine nationalism' could be costly, how Americans feel about voting during a pandemic, why women are leaving the workforce, and more.

    Oct 30, 2020

  • Woman and two young children place a ballot in a mailbox, photo by ArtMarie/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Democracy Depends on Hearing All Voters' Voices

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the confinement measures imposed in response, holding safe, effective, and timely democratic elections has become increasingly challenging. The risk of disenfranchising large parts of the electorate is real and should be prevented. In these difficult circumstances, governments need to increase their efforts to guarantee that every voter can exercise their right to vote.

    Oct 30, 2020

  • A family wearing masks while unloading their groceries, photo by RyanJLane/Getty Images

    Report

    American Health Attitudes During COVID-19

    In a survey including people of color and those with low- to moderate-incomes, most prioritized health even when it implies limitations to their liberty and to the economy. But white and non-white respondents differed when weighing the risk of getting COVID-19 with opening the economy or protesting injustice.

    Oct 29, 2020

  • Customers are served at the Destiny USA mall during the reopening as COVID-19 restrictions are eased in Syracuse, New York, July 10, 2020, photo by Maranie Staab/Reuters

    Commentary

    How Much Do Americans Value Their Health During the Pandemic?

    Do Americans believe that limiting the spread of COVID-19 justifies the social and economic costs of physical-distancing measures? Researchers conducted a survey to better understand how Americans weigh health against other priorities.

    Oct 29, 2020

  • Vials of COVID-19 vaccine, photo by MarsBars/Getty Images

    Report

    COVID-19 'Vaccine Nationalism' Could Cost $1.2 Trillion a Year

    Nationalistic behavior by governments may exclude some countries from access to COVID-19 vaccines. This could cost the world economy up to $1.2 trillion a year in GDP. A globally coordinated effort to fight the pandemic is key, not only from a public health perspective but also an economic one.

    Oct 28, 2020

  • An election worker places mail-in ballots into a voting box at a drive-through drop off location in San Diego, California, October 19, 2020, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Commentary

    Ensuring the Safety and Integrity of the Vote

    The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the U.S. election into disarray coming on top of disruptions to traditional campaigning and the increased burden on election officials. Still, with careful planning, the election can be held with integrity, while keeping the American electorate safe. But it will require everyone to help.

    Oct 23, 2020

  • COVID-19 newspaper headline clippings, photo by JJ Gouin/Getty Images

    Multimedia

    RAND Remote Series: Tackling an Evolving Pandemic

    In this video conversation, Jennifer Bouey discusses RAND's rapid COVID-19 response, including insights and analysis to help strengthen and safeguard communities, rethink and retool institutions, and determine the best ways forward.

    Oct 22, 2020

  • A hand reaching for a bottle of wine on a store shelf. Photo by ipopba / Getty Images

    Journal Article

    Changes in Adult Alcohol Use and Consequences During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the US

    A national longitudinal survey of 1,540 adults ages 30-80 in 2019 and 2020 shows that people drank more frequently, and for women in particular, more heavily and with more negative consequences, during the initial stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Oct 16, 2020

  • Blog

    Russian Propaganda, Domestic Terrorism, America's Electric Grid: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how Americans react to Russian memes on Facebook, the possibility of domestic terrorism during election season, protecting the U.S. electric grid, and more.

    Oct 16, 2020

  • Blog

    Election Interference on Twitter, Insulin Prices, Remote Learning: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on evidence of interference in the 2020 election on Twitter, U.S. insulin prices compared to those of other countries, how parents can help their kids' education stay on track during the pandemic, and more.

    Oct 9, 2020

  • Is the U.S. Postal Service Essential?

    Multimedia

    Is the United States Postal Service Essential?

    RAND sociologist Michael Pollard describes the essential services the U.S. Postal Service provides and the pandemic's effect on USPS operations.

    Oct 7, 2020

  • Blog

    How Russia Targets U.S. Elections, Black Workers and COVID-19, TikTok: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how Russia targets U.S. elections, Americans' increased alcohol consumption during the pandemic, Black workers and COVID-19, and more.

    Oct 2, 2020

  • Woman with a shopping cart wearing a mask and gloves in the alcohol aisle at the grocery store, photo by coldsnowstorm/Getty Images

    News Release

    Alcohol Consumption Rises Sharply During the Pandemic; Heavy Drinking by Women Rises 41%

    American adults have sharply increased their alcohol consumption during the COVID-19 shutdown, with women increasing their heavy-drinking episodes (four or more drinks within a couple of hours) by 41 percent.

    Sep 29, 2020

  • A teacher showing a globe to her online elementary students, photo by ake1150sb/Getty Images

    Report

    Schools Weren't Prepared for a Crisis Like COVID-19

    Before COVID-19, less than half of U.S. public schools had a written plan for dealing with a pandemic. And only 38 states had publicly available school health emergency plans. How did schools' preparation affect their transitions to remote learning and principals' confidence in student achievement?

    Sep 29, 2020

  • Election worker Gisela Alberg cleans a voting booth at Sonoma Elementary School during the primary election in Las Cruces, New Mexico, U.S., June 2, 2020, photo by Paul Ratje/Reuters

    Multimedia

    RAND Remote Series: Preparing for Elections During a Pandemic

    In this video conversation, RAND's Jennifer Kavanagh and Quentin Hodgson discuss the unique voting challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Sep 25, 2020

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