Evidence Based Health Practice

Evidence-based health practice applies the scientific method to use the best available evidence—from physical exams, diagnostic reviews, medical research, and known risks and benefits of treatment options—when making medical decisions. RAND has investigated the impact of adopting evidence-based health practices on patient care and health care policies, and the greater implications of using a national quality measurement and reporting system.

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    Alina I. Palimaru

    Associate Policy Researcher
    Education Ph.D. in health policy, UC Los Angeles; M.P.P. in public policy, American University; B.A. in history, Drexel University

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    Julia Rollison

    Senior Policy Researcher
    Education Ph.D. in research, measurement and evaluation, Boston College; M.P.H. in global health, The George Washington University; B.S. in applied psychology, Ithaca College

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    Lisa V. Rubenstein

    Adjunct Physician Policy Researcher
    Education M.D., Albert Einstein School of Medicine, New York; M.S.P.H., University of California, Los Angeles; B.A., Sarah Lawrence College

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    Kanaka Shetty

    Physician Policy Researcher; Affiliate Faculty, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education B.S. in biophysics, Yale University; M.D., New York University; M.S. in health services research, Stanford University

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    Justin W. Timbie

    Senior Health Policy Researcher
    Education Ph.D. in health policy, Harvard University; B.A. in Biology, Spanish, University of Pennsylvania

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