Families

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A multigenerational group of people who share a close relationship and generally live in the same household, with one or more parents caring for biological or adopted children, families also include adult children who care for their elderly parents. RAND research on families spans various populations and socioeconomic backgrounds in developed as well as developing countries and addresses such topics as child welfare, fertility, marriage and divorce, and household economic security.

Explore Families

  • Couple reviewing finances with an advisor

    Commentary

    The Cost of Dementia: Who Will Pay?

    It is time for the government in partnership with industry to return to the drawing board to craft a plan that will provide protection for the more than 9 million people who will need care for dementia by 2040, writes Michael D. Hurd.

    May 1, 2013

  • Young woman and grandfather sitting hand in hand at table

    Commentary

    Dementia's Growing Cost to Caregivers

    At the rate that the U.S. population is aging, the total cost of dementia could reach half a trillion dollars a year by 2040. Those who care for impaired relatives and friends are acutely aware of the effects of dementia, and unfortunately they are all too familiar with its costs, writes Kathleen J. Mullen.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • College students pass out free condoms at a health fair

    Commentary

    Can Catholic Colleges Block Free Condom Distribution?

    If this issue were to be decided on the basis of public health benefits, the outcome would be clear: Condoms indisputably prevent both unintended pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted infections, writes Chloe Bird.

    Apr 23, 2013

  • gun in dresser drawer

    Commentary

    Guns in Homes: A Health Hazard

    An ample body of evidence indicates that the benefits of keeping a gun for protection are substantially outweighed by the associated risks, writes Art Kellermann.

    Mar 25, 2013

  • News Release

    News Release

    Military Caregivers Aid Injured Warriors, but Little Is Known About Their Needs

    Spouses, family members, and others who provide informal care to U.S. military members after they return home from conflict often toil long hours with little support, putting them at risk for physical, emotional, and financial harm.

    Mar 7, 2013

  • man in wheelchair with caregiver

    Commentary

    A National Strategy for Supporting Military Caregivers

    The act of caring for a veteran takes a physical, mental, and economic toll on caregivers and their families. Giving caregivers the skills and resources they need to cope and thrive should be as much a priority as giving veterans medical care.

    Mar 7, 2013

  • family grieving

    Commentary

    Shifting the Burden of Mental Health Care: Helping Families

    In our national conversation on mental health, we should remember the role of families when thinking about treatment and ensure that our policies open up opportunities to support parents, siblings and relatives, and enhance their capacity for care, writes Ramya Chari.

    Dec 21, 2012

  • young woman smoking and drinking coffee

    Commentary

    Teen Employment May Not Always Be a Boon for At-Risk Youth

    For all teens, and especially those who have already experienced problems related to alcohol and drug use, it is essential to monitor the quality of work experiences and keep in mind that some work environments might increase risk for substance use.

    Dec 18, 2012

  • couple consoling each other in front of Christmas tree

    Commentary

    Supporting Families Affected by Military Suicide Should Be a Priority for All

    While many of these families fight for honor and respect from the DoD or support from the VA, the comfort that they need will not be provided by either institution, nor should it be. Rather, it is up to us—as their neighbors, coworkers, teachers, and students—to shower these families with the love and support they need and deserve, writes Rajeev Ramchand.

    Nov 29, 2012

  • News Release

    News Release

    Frequent Alcohol Testing Program Reduces DUI and Domestic Violence Arrests

    In its first six years, an innovative alcohol monitoring program called the South Dakota 24/7 Sobriety Project reduced county-level repeat DUI arrests by 12 percent and domestic violence arrests by 9 percent.

    Nov 15, 2012

  • A Soldier from the Michigan National Guard, is welcomed home by his daughter after a year long tour in Afghanistan on Sept. 28, 2012.

    Blog

    RAND Research for Military Family Month

    RAND is a resource for research and policy recommendations that address the challenges faced by military members, spouses, and their children.

    Nov 7, 2012

  • Birth control pills

    Commentary

    California Improves on Affordable Care Act by Letting RNs Dispense Birth Control

    As we look for ways to provide efficient, high-quality and cost-effective healthcare to more Americans, states may study California as a potential model for how to do more to deliver on what the Affordable Care Act has to offer women, while saving money at the same time, writes Chloe Bird.

    Oct 9, 2012

  • sad girl

    Project

    CBITS Offers Online Training and Support to Improve Mental Health of Children and Families

    The Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) program is a school-based, group, and individual intervention. CBITS is designed to reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and behavioral problems, and to improve grades and attendance, peer and parent support, and coping skills.

    Sep 11, 2012

  • woman with doctor

    Commentary

    Supporting Comprehensive Healthcare for Women Makes Dollars, and Sense

    As we look for ways to provide efficient, high-quality, and cost-effective health care to more Americans, we can't afford to ignore women's health issues, including reproductive health care and the cost savings that contraceptive access provides, writes Chloe Bird.

    Sep 5, 2012

  • girls smoking

    Commentary

    Parents: That Summer Job Could Be Teaching Your Youngster to Smoke

    Workplaces across the world that rely on a teenage workforce, like supermarkets and fast food restaurants, need to do a better job protecting young people from starting to smoke, writes Rajeev Ramchand.

    Aug 30, 2012

  • A captain briefs a group of quick reaction force airmen while they board a mine resistant ambush protected vehicle as part of a combat-stress therapy scenario at Joint Base Balad, Iraq, August 20, 2009

    Blog

    RAND Research Contributes to the 11th Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation

    Adequate compensation is critical to recruiting and retaining an all-volunteer force—in peacetime and wartime alike. To assess the effectiveness of U.S. military pay and benefits, the president directs a review of military compensation every four years. Four RAND studies contributed to this review.

    Jun 29, 2012

  • Marine calling a counseling hotline

    Commentary

    Preventing Military Suicides Is a Nationwide Effort

    The numbers of suicides among military personnel is a reminder for us involved in prevention to remain vigilant and work even harder. Let it be a wake-up call to the nation to assume some of the responsibility as well, writes Rajeev Ramchand.

    Jun 14, 2012

  • Women's health rally in front of the Supreme Court building

    Commentary

    Celebrating Birth Control on Mother's Day? Not as Counterintuitive as It Sounds

    Reliable birth control contributed to economic development by reducing women's risk of dropping out of school associated with early childbearing and high fertility rates, contributing in turn to increases in women's labor force participation, the continuity of their careers, and the standard of living of women, children and families, writes Chloe Bird.

    May 11, 2012

  • military children

    Blog

    Celebrating the Month of the Military Child

    April is the Month of the Military Child, a national initiative to support and honor America's service members and their families. The celebration is being recognized with events around the country, and is a key national initiative of First Lady Michelle Obama.

    Apr 5, 2012

  • A returning U.S. soldier getting hugged by his family

    Commentary

    Military Families: What We Know and What We Don't Know

    Never before in our nation's history have our service members and their families been so challenged and never before have their struggles (and successes) been the topic of so much scholarly attention, writes Sarah O. Meadows.

    Mar 2, 2012