Gender Integration in the Military

Featured

  • Members of a U.S. Coast Guard Officer Candidate School class and an NOAA Basic Officer Training Course class at a graduation ceremony May 9, 2017, photo by PO3 Nicole Barger/U.S. Coast Guard

    Report

    How the U.S. Coast Guard Could Increase Its Diversity

    Aug 11, 2021

    Women and racial and ethnic minorities are underrepresented in the United States Coast Guard, especially in higher ranks and senior leadership. Changes are needed across the personnel lifecycle, from recruiting to career development, advancement and promotions, retention, and climate.

  • U.S. Army specialist in a door-to-door exercise at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California, June 20, 2014, photo by Spc. Charles Probst/U.S. Army

    Report

    The Behavioral Health of Minority Service Members

    Feb 1, 2021

    Members of minority groups make up a larger percentage of the U.S. military than ever before. Identifying whether and where behavioral health disparities exist among them can help the Department of Defense better address troops' mental health needs and improve force readiness.

Explore Gender Integration in the Military

  • U.S. Army Capt. Jennifer Peace poses near her home in Spanaway, Washington, August 28, 2015

    Essay

    Transgender Troops: Fit to Serve

    The Pentagon's decision to open the ranks to transgender service members was informed by months of RAND research into the costs and numbers involved.

    Aug 18, 2016

  • News Release

    News Release

    Impact of Transgender Personnel on Readiness and Health Care Costs in the U.S. Military Likely to Be Small

    The U.S. Department of Defense has been reviewing its policy that bans transgender personnel from serving openly. If transgender people were allowed to serve openly, the number would likely be a small fraction of the total force and have minimal impact on readiness and health care costs.

    Jun 30, 2016

  • U.S. Marines storm aboard MSC dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Laramie during a visit, board, search, and seizure exercise

    Report

    The Implications of Allowing Transgender Personnel to Serve Openly

    If the U.S. military decides to let transgender people serve openly, the number would likely be a small fraction of the total force and have minimal impact on readiness and health care costs.

    Jun 30, 2016

  • A 23rd Special Tactics Training Squadron student guards the perimeter in a counter-insurgency exercise

    Research Brief

    The Implications of Allowing Transgender Personnel to Serve Openly

    As the U.S. Department of Defense reviews potential changes to its policy on transgender service members, it will need to consider this population's unique health care needs, the potential costs associated with extending coverage for these needs, and the readiness implications of allowing transgender service members to serve openly.

    Jun 30, 2016

  • Periodical

    Periodical

    RAND Review: May-June 2016

    This issue highlights integrative medicine and the future of health care; the RAND American Life Panel; a commentary on how to expedite the process of resolving open cases at Guantánamo Bay; women soldiers on the special ops battlefield; and more.

    May 2, 2016

  • Special Operations Forces utilize the Melrose Air Force Range's rough terrain and unique layout to conduct realistic training, November 8, 2012

    Report

    Considerations for Integrating Women into U.S. Special Ops Forces

    A survey of special operations forces (SOF) personnel identified their concerns with allowing women to fill SOF positions. Many said they thought mission effectiveness and unit cohesion would suffer as a result.

    Dec 16, 2015

  • Female Engagement Team members Pfc. Kelly Shutka, Pfc. Rachel Miller, and Sgt. Richelle Aus patrol a bazaar in Zabul province, Afghanistan.

    Report

    What Are the Restrictions on the Service of Active-Component Military Women?

    Most of the U.S. military positions that remain closed to women service members are those in Army and Marine Corps units and occupations that have a primary mission of engaging in direct ground combat.

    May 21, 2012

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Military Readiness: Women Are Not a Problem

    Integration of women has had a small effect on readiness, cohesion, and morale — leadership, training, and the unit workload are perceived as having a far more profound influence.

    Jan 1, 1997

  • Report

    Report

    New Opportunities for Military Women: Effects Upon Readiness, Cohesion, and Morale

    Gender integration has had only small effects on the matters that count most: defense readiness, unit cohesion, and morale.

    Jan 1, 1997

  • People

    People

    Amy Burnett Cross

    Summer Associate
    Education Certificate in gender analysis in economics, American University; MA in economics, American University; BA in economics, University of Colorado

  • People

    People

    Andrea M. Abler

    Technical Analyst
    Education M.A. in security studies, Georgetown University; M.S. in oceanography, University of California San Diego; B.S. in physics, University of Maryland Baltimore County; B.A. in history, University of Maryland Baltimore County

  • People

    People

    Laura L. Miller

    Senior Social Scientist; Quality Assurance Manager, RAND Project Air Force
    Education Ph.D. and M.A. in sociology, Northwestern University; B.A. in European and Soviet studies, University of Redlands

  • People

    People

    Sean Robson

    Senior Behavioral/Social Scientist
    Education Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology, University of Tulsa; B.S. in psychology, James Madison University

  • People

    People

    Sarah Weilant

    Senior Policy Analyst
    Education M.P.P. in public policy, American University