Health Economics

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Financing the efficient delivery of medical services while reducing costs for consumers as well as health care providers is among the most challenging domestic policy problems many countries face. RAND addresses health economics issues through innovative, high-profile research in an effort to improve the efficiency of health care organizations, reduce costs for providers and consumers, and improve financing in health care markets.

  • Report

    COVID-19 'Vaccine Nationalism' Could Cost $1.2 Trillion a Year

    Nationalistic behavior by governments may exclude some countries from access to COVID-19 vaccines. This could cost the world economy up to $1.2 trillion a year in GDP. A globally coordinated effort to fight the pandemic is key, not only from a public health perspective but also an economic one.

    Oct 28, 2020

  • Report

    U.S. Prescription Drug Prices Are 2.56 Times Those in Other Countries

    Prices for prescription drugs in the United States in 2018 were 256 percent of those in 32 comparison countries. For brand-name drugs, U.S. prices were 344 percent higher. But for generic drugs, they were only 84 percent of the average paid in other nations.

    Jan 28, 2021

Explore Health Economics

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Brand-name Prescription Drug Use Among Veterans Affairs and Medicare Part D Patients with Diabetes: A National Cohort Comparison

    Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes use 2 to 3 times more brand-name drugs than a comparable group within the VA, at substantial excess cost.

    Jul 1, 2013

  • Harrisburg, Pennsylvania panorama

    Report

    Revenue, Spending Reductions Will Offset Costs of Expanding Medicaid in PA

    While the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act will require additional spending by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, these costs will be more than offset by additional revenue or reductions in other spending in the 2014-2020 timeframe.

    Jun 24, 2013

  • People sitting in waiting room at hospital

    Testimony

    Expanding Medicaid Is the Best Financial Option for States

    States that choose not to expand Medicaid under federal health care reform will leave millions of their residents without health insurance and increase spending, at least in the short term, on the cost of treating uninsured residents.

    Jun 12, 2013

  • Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital

    Commentary

    Saving Grady: Reflections on Kate Neuhausen's Narrative Matters Essay

    It was widely assumed that Atlanta's Grady Memorial Hospital would be the next storied public hospital close its doors, but at its darkest hour, it received help from an unexpected quarter, says Art Kellermann.

    Jun 10, 2013

  • A woman is wheeled through an emergency department on a gurney.

    Commentary

    Covering Emergency Care for Young Adults: Is the ACA Doing Its Job?

    The dependent coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act is working as intended, say Andrew Mulcahy and Katherine Harris. In 2011, it spared individuals and hospitals from $147 million in emergency room costs.

    Jun 5, 2013

  • pills and 50 euro note

    Report

    International Price Comparison for Pharmaceuticals

    The international impact of pharmaceutical pricing changes in the United Kingdom is likely to be minimal or indirect. This is due largely to the diverse ways that various other countries implement international price comparisons.

    Jun 4, 2013

  • News Release

    News Release

    Expanding Medicaid Is Best Financial Option for States

    States that choose not to expand Medicaid under federal health care reform will leave millions of their residents without health insurance and increase spending on the cost of treating uninsured residents, at least in the short term.

    Jun 3, 2013

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    Journal Article

    The Value of Diagnostic Testing in Personalized Medicine

    A framework derived from information economics for assessing the value of diagnostics demonstrates that the social value of such diagnostics can be very large, both by avoiding unnecessary treatment and by identifying patients who otherwise would not get treated.

    Jun 1, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Fair Pricing Law Prompts Most California Hospitals to Adopt Policies to Protect Uninsured Patients from High Charges

    Most CA hospitals have adopted financial assistance policies to provide more affordable care for the uninsured. Ninety-seven percent of hospitals say they offer free care to uninsured patients with incomes at or below the federal poverty level.

    Jun 1, 2013

  • News Release

    News Release

    Health Reform Shields Young Adults from Emergency Medical Costs

    A new federal law allowing young adults to remain on their parents' medical insurance through age 25 has shielded them, their families, and hospitals from the full financial consequences of serious medical emergencies.

    May 29, 2013

  • News Release

    News Release

    Strategies Could Curb Medicare Costs, but Also Drive Seniors Out of Insurance Program

    The rising cost of Medicare can be cut through strategies such as increasing premiums and raising the eligibility age, but those moves could drive many elderly Americans from the program, leaving them with limited access to health services.

    May 6, 2013

  • Couple reviewing finances with an advisor

    Commentary

    The Cost of Dementia: Who Will Pay?

    It is time for the government in partnership with industry to return to the drawing board to craft a plan that will provide protection for the more than 9 million people who will need care for dementia by 2040, writes Michael D. Hurd.

    May 1, 2013

  • Doctor examining female senior patient with elbow pain

    Journal Article

    Strategies Could Curb Medicare Costs, but Also Drive Seniors Out of the Program

    The rising cost of Medicare can be cut through strategies such as increasing premiums and raising the eligibility age, but those moves could drive many elderly Americans from the program, leaving them with limited access to health services.

    May 1, 2013

  • Young woman and grandfather sitting hand in hand at table

    Commentary

    Dementia's Growing Cost to Caregivers

    At the rate that the U.S. population is aging, the total cost of dementia could reach half a trillion dollars a year by 2040. Those who care for impaired relatives and friends are acutely aware of the effects of dementia, and unfortunately they are all too familiar with its costs, writes Kathleen J. Mullen.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • Commentary

    Governors Missing the Point on Medicaid

    While a governor or legislator may disagree with Medicaid expansion for philosophical reasons, the claims that the expansion will be a burden on states' economies seem misguided given the full range of projected economic impacts on the states, writes Carter C. Price.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • Young doctor holding elderly woman

    Journal Article

    Impact of Socioeconomic Adjustment on Physicians' Relative Cost of Care

    Ongoing efforts to profile physicians on their relative cost of care have been criticized because they do not account for differences in patients' socioeconomic status (SES).

    Apr 26, 2013

  • U.S. Army medical researchers take part in World Malaria Day 2010, Kisumu, Kenya April 25, 2010

    Commentary

    The Economic Promise of Malaria Reduction

    Better understanding of how malaria reduction affects different households, regions, and economic sectors in Sub-Saharan Africa could allow policymakers to assess alternative intervention strategies and allocate resources more efficiently and effectively.

    Apr 24, 2013

  • an elderly woman with a caretaker

    Testimony

    The Monetary Costs of Dementia in the United States

    Identifying the costs of dementia is challenging because persons who have it are likely to have co-existing chronic health problems, making isolating the costs among other costs difficult. Also, it is unclear how to attribute a monetary cost to informal caregiving.

    Apr 24, 2013

  • an elderly couple, man possibly with dementia

    Journal Article

    Cost of Dementia Tops $159 Billion Annually in the United States

    The monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges from $159 billion to $215 billion annually, making the disease more costly to the nation than either heart disease or cancer. The greatest cost is associated with providing institutional and home-based long-term care rather than medical services.

    Apr 1, 2013

  • Prescription pills spilled out over $20 bills.

    Commentary

    Remove Medicare's Straitjacket

    Removing the constraints on Medicare would not only lead to lower prices at the drugstore, hospital and doctor's office, it could spark a new era of healthcare innovation, writes Arthur Kellermann.

    Mar 29, 2013

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