Health, Health Care, and Aging

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RAND advances understanding of health and health behaviors, and examines how the organization and financing of care affect costs, quality, and access. Our body of research includes innovative studies of health insurance, health care reform, and health information technology, as well as obesity, substance abuse, and PTSD. RAND findings also help inform policies that aim to improve the health of seniors and the care they receive.

  • Research Brief

    Early Insights from the Equity-First Vaccination Initiative

    Dec 20, 2021

    Vaccination rates among communities that identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) continue to lag relative to the total population. To increase vaccine confidence and access for these populations, the Equity-First Vaccination Initiative employs hyper-local, community-led strategies.

  • Older man on the phone looking at a medication bottle, photo by shapecharge/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Rethinking the Impact of Audio-Only Visits on Health Equity

    Dec 17, 2021

    New pandemic-era flexibility that allowed audio-only health visits to be routinely reimbursed as telehealth may be leading to substandard care for those it was meant to serve. It may be time to consider limiting audio-only visits in the pursuit of health equity.

Explore Health, Health Care, and Aging

  • A doctor calls a patient using a landline, photo by SDI Productions/Getty Images

    Commentary

    The Uncertain Future of Audio-Only Visits and Why We Need Them to Address Disparities

    Audio-only health care visits have been instrumental in maintaining access to care during the pandemic. Despite this, coverage for audio-only visits is likely temporary. Devaluing and prematurely casting off a key telemedicine modality could mean the difference between a needed doctor visit and no visit at all.

    Mar 12, 2021

  • Jessica Arana (left) delivering over 1,400 handmade masks to Tia Chucha's cultural center in Sylmar, California, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Blog

    RAND Staff Member Helps Get Masks to Communities in Need

    Jessica Arana, a designer at RAND, volunteers with the Auntie Sewing Squad, a mask-making effort started by comedian Kristina Wong. Arana first donated to the effort but soon became an organizer focused on minority, immigrant, farmworker, and low-income communities.

    Mar 12, 2021

  • People wait in line in a Disneyland parking lot to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Anaheim, California, January 13, 2021, photo by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

    Commentary

    How Game Theory Could Solve the COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Puzzle

    The health systems behind the vaccine rollout are attempting to create order from chaos, sometimes with mixed results. Rather than relying on on-the-fly decisionmaking, state authorities should consider turning to game theory as a tool that could be the key to more efficient, faster vaccine distribution.

    Mar 11, 2021

  • Closeup of two peoples' hands holding each other, photo by Obencem/Getty Images

    Essay

    Giving Family Caregivers a Voice

    One in every five American adults is caring for a loved one in need. Too often, they have to fight to make their voices heard in a health care system that doesn't always see them as the partners in care they can be. More could be done to integrate them into patients' health care teams.

    Mar 10, 2021

  • Young Black couple asleep in bed, photo by Eva-Katalin/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Don't Let 'Springing Forward' Set You Back in Your Relationship

    When we're sleep-deprived, we're more irritable, more prone to conflict, our communication skills suffer, and we're less empathic. Here are five tips to help you protect the health of your body and your relationship as you and your partner weather the storm of daylight saving time.

    Mar 10, 2021

  • News Release

    News Release

    COVID-19 Testing in Schools Complex But Doable, Worth the Effort

    COVID-19 testing can be effectively integrated into K–12 schools' pandemic response plans, helping families and staff feel more comfortable with in-person instruction.

    Mar 9, 2021

  • Exploring Workplace Financial Wellbeing Interventions

    Multimedia

    Exploring Workplace Financial Wellbeing Interventions

    Workplace financial wellbeing interventions could offer a key means for addressing rising financial concerns and mental health issues in the workplace. In this video, Christian van Stolk and Jennifer Bousfield describe their findings from an extensive analysis of British and Asian workplace survey data.

    Mar 9, 2021

  • Anita Chandra speaking at an event, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Q&A

    What Communities Need to Thrive: Q&A with Anita Chandra

    Anita Chandra, vice president and director of RAND Social and Economic Well-Being, focuses on issues of health, well-being, and equity. She is researching how to create a culture of health, how to address inequities in the U.S. health system, and disaster response and resilience, especially in the context of the pandemic.

    Mar 8, 2021

  • Trenton Duerksen cleans a Triceratops horridus dinosaur on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, September 1, 2020, photo by Anthony Behar/Reuters

    Commentary

    Arts Policy During the Pandemic: What Are We Measuring, and What Can We Know?

    Few data sources exist for the labor market for artists. Of the sources that do exist, each measures a different piece of a larger puzzle. Those studying the arts labor market will have to grapple with which data source to use and how “the arts” should be defined before undertaking any analysis.

    Mar 8, 2021

  • Blog

    Vaccine Hesitancy, Sexual Misconduct in the U.S. Military, the Iran Nuclear Deal: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on Black Americans’ vaccine hesitancy, sexual harassment and sexual assault in the U.S. military, rejoining the Iran nuclear deal, and more.

    Mar 5, 2021

  • High school teacher in classroom with students wearing face masks, photo by RichVintage/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Teachers Have Lost Out on Professional Development. Summer Programs Could Help

    For thousands of teachers across the United States, 2020 was a year of uncertainty. Many lacked access to their usual professional learning activities. Summer programs for students that also offer learning opportunities for teachers might help make up for lost time.

    Mar 5, 2021

  • Transform Mental Health

    Multimedia

    It Is Time to Transform U.S. Mental Health Care

    RAND health policy researcher Ryan McBain presents reasons why now is the right time to address problems in the U.S. mental health system.

    Mar 2, 2021

  • News Release

    News Release

    Black Americans Report High Levels of Vaccine Hesitancy, Including Among Health Care Workers

    Black Americans have a high level of vaccine hesitancy and mistrust of COVID-19 vaccines, including among Black health care workers. Those who expressed vaccine hesitancy also showed high levels of overall mistrust in the vaccine, concerns about potential harm and side effects, and lack of confidence in vaccine effectiveness and safety.

    Mar 1, 2021

  • News Release

    Bundled Payments for Surgical Procedures With Copay Waivers Creates Substantial Cost Savings

    Providing patients discounts for using medical providers that agree to charge one set price for expensive procedures such as knee replacement surgery can result in savings for both patients and payers.

    Mar 1, 2021

  • Stethoscope and U.S. one hundred dollar bill with face mask on insurance form, photo by aldarinho/Getty Images

    Commentary

    ACA Subsidies for Higher-Income Families Are Key to Enrolling More Americans

    The House Ways and Means Committee has proposed several insurance reforms in its emergency COVID-19 relief package, including increasing subsidizes and extending subsidies to people with higher incomes. The proposed combined approach is a far more efficient means of covering uninsured Americans than enhancing subsidies only for those who are currently eligible.

    Mar 1, 2021

  • A senuir Hispanic man in a wheelchair with his adult daughter, photo by kali9/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Family Caregivers Are the Health Care Workers That Vaccination Plans Overlook

    About 53 million family members and friends provide care to loved ones in the United States, representing a critical element of the long-term care system. The pandemic has made family caregivers front-line workers. They can't be left out of important discussions around vaccination priorities and how to minimize the virus's risk to those with compromised health.

    Mar 1, 2021

  • Blog

    Teachers Quit Due to Stress, Peace in Yemen, America's Middle Class: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how stress leads teachers to quit their jobs, U.S. strategy in the Middle East, America's shrinking middle class, and more.

    Feb 26, 2021

  • Doctor Maria Alonso (R, purple shirt) and medical students from the University of Puerto Rico visit patients in a neighbourhood affected by Hurricane Maria in September, in Corozal, Puerto Rico January 20, 2018, photo by Alvin Baez/Fotostation

    Multimedia

    RAND Remote: Partnering with Communities on Puerto Rico Disaster Recovery

    In this RAND Remote conversation, Marielena Lara and Gabriela Castro discuss the partnered approach they used to support reconstruction and recovery efforts in Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricanes Irma and Maria.

    Feb 25, 2021

  • Healthcare Resource Allocation

    Multimedia

    Allocating Scarce Resources During a Pandemic

    RAND senior behavioral/social scientist Lori Frank and senior policy researcher Thomas Concannon discuss their work in developing the Core Guidance Checklist for health care resource allocation decisionmaking during a pandemic.

    Feb 23, 2021

  • News Release

    News Release

    Stress Was Leading Reason Teachers Quit Before Pandemic, and COVID-19 Has Made Matters Worse

    Stress was the most common reason teachers cited for leaving the profession before and during the pandemic. Three of four former teachers said work was often or always stressful in the most recent year in which they taught in a public school.

    Feb 22, 2021