Infectious Diseases

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  • Ambulances seen outside NYU Langone Hospital's Emergency entrance during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in New York City, March 31, 2020, photo by Brendan McDermid/Reuters

    Report

    Promising Strategies for Creating Critical Care Capacity in U.S. Hospitals

    Apr 3, 2020

    Hospitals can prepare for a surge of patients critically ill with COVID-19, but it will require hospital leaders, practitioners, and regional officials to adopt drastic measures that challenge the standard way of providing care. A new RAND tool can help them estimate current capacity and explore ways to increase it.

  • Hospital staff wear protective gear to protect them from an Ebola virus infection in the emergency department of Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, New York, October 8, 2014, photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters

    Report

    The U.S. System of Care for Infectious Diseases Could Be Improved

    Feb 7, 2020

    The current system of care for rare but serious infectious diseases in the United States could be strengthened or more formalized in several ways. But how could these efforts be financed, both in terms of initial investments and long-term sustainability?

Explore Infectious Diseases

  • Journal Article

    Changes in ART Adherence Relate to Changes in Depression as Well! Evidence for the Bi-directional Longitudinal Relationship Between Depression and ART Adherence from a Prospective Study of HIV Clients in Uganda

    While other research has examined and supported the influence of depression on ART adherence, our data support the reciprocal relationship: that non-adherence and changes in adherence are associated with levels and changes in depression.

    May 12, 2020

  • Journal Article

    Psychological Symptoms Among Frontline Healthcare Workers During COVID-19 Outbreak in Wuhan

    To examine the psychosocial impact of COVID-19 on frontline healthcare workers in Wuhan, we collected data between February 13-17, 2020 through a smartphone-based survey.

    May 12, 2020

  • A laboratory technician working on research for a vaccine against COVID-19 in Bern, Switzerland, April 22, 2020, photo by Arnd Wiegmann/Reuters

    Commentary

    Needed: A Blueprint for a Post-Vaccine World

    When a COVID-19 vaccine is developed, many in rich countries may be able to afford it while the poor and uninsured may not. The time to plan for equitable access, financing, intellectual property rights, and global production is now.

    May 11, 2020

  • Women work on a production line at a mobile phone factory in Assuit, Egypt, September 30, 2018, photo by Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters

    Commentary

    Economic Recovery in Egypt Should Include Women

    Despite tremendous strides in educational attainment, women's engagement in the labor force in Egypt remains limited. Will Egypt's post-pandemic recovery further exacerbate structural barriers and inequities? Or could the current economic crisis be an opportunity to develop new opportunities to employ women and foster conditions for a more inclusive and diversified labor force?

    May 11, 2020

  • Laboratory worker working under a laboratory exhaust hood, photo by Marc Dufresne/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Biosecurity Is the Lesson We Need to Learn from the Coronavirus Pandemic

    Biological outbreaks have been a fear among experts for decades and human activities present windows of vulnerability. To address this, America needs to have a new approach to biosafety and biosecurity that addresses the full range of biological threats that humankind and the global environment will face in the future.

    May 11, 2020

  • A C-130J Hercules from the 146th Airlift Wing, California Air National Guard, sprays fire retardant ahead of the leading edge of the Thomas Fire, Dec. 13, 2017, photo by Master Sgt. Brian Ferguson/U.S. Air Force

    Report

    Environment, Geography, and the Future of Warfare

    Some of the most significant environmental and geographic trends that could affect U.S. national security and the future of warfare are rising global temperatures, the opening of the Arctic, sea level rise, extreme weather events, water scarcity, and increasing urbanization.

    May 11, 2020

  • Blog

    Reopening America, China's 'Mask Diplomacy,' State Police Powers: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on a RAND tool that estimates the public health and economic effects of reopening America, China's “mask diplomacy,” using police powers for pandemic response, and more.

    May 8, 2020

  • Officials wearing protective gear take body temperatures at a check point, in Marneuli near Tbilisi, Georgia, March 23, 2020, photo by Irakli Gedenidze/Reuters

    Commentary

    COVID-19 Crisis Could Spur Post-Soviet Fixes

    Much of the post-Soviet space remains afflicted with authoritarian rule, inefficient economies, corruption, and regional tensions. The COVID-19 crisis could prod countries to address key issues, but they will need help. Targeted Western aid could help willing countries make progress.

    May 8, 2020

  • A man speaks with a library worker after receiving an unemployment form in Hialeah, Florida, April 8, 2020, photo by Marco Bello/Reuters

    Commentary

    The Historic Economic Effects of COVID-19

    The extent of COVID-19's effect on the labor market will be catastrophic for many workers and businesses. Matching the unemployment rate peak set by the Great Depression is not even necessary to establish the historic nature of the downturn that we're living through.

    May 7, 2020

  • A worker from the city's center for disease control and prevention draws blood from a man to conduct a test for antibodies against COVID-19 in Suifenhe, China, April 16, 2020, photo by Huizhong Wu/Reuters

    Testimony

    China's Health System Reform and Global Health Strategy in the Context of COVID-19

    In response to SARS, China restructured its public health system in 2004. It has also prioritized health care system reforms over the past decade. What are the implications of these developments on China's response to COVID-19? And how can the United States engage China in global pandemic response?

    May 7, 2020

  • Passersby walk past a countdown clock showing the adjusted days and time until the start of the postponed Tokyo Paralympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, April 1, 2020, photo by Issei Kato/Reuters

    Commentary

    Jumpstarting the U.S.-Japan-Korea Trilateral Amid COVID-19

    Since roughly 2012, South Korea–Japan ties have frayed. Could the United States encourage trilateral medical cooperation during the pandemic, ensure that the Tokyo Olympic Games are held, and in so doing help heal the relationship between Seoul and Tokyo?

    May 6, 2020

  • A TV reporter wearing a mask, photo by brightstars/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Don't Make the Pandemic Worse with Poor Data Analysis

    The need for immediate answers in the face of severe public health and economic distress may create a temptation to relax statistical standards. But urgency should not preclude expert analysis and honest assessments of uncertainty. Mistaken assumptions could lead to counterproductive actions.

    May 6, 2020

  • A woman walks past a portrait of Chinese President Xi Jinping, Shanghai, China March 12, 2020, photo by Aly Song/Reuters

    Commentary

    Don't Be Fooled by China's Mask Diplomacy

    China has provided coronavirus-related aid to hundreds of countries. This appears to be an effort to make the world forget its role in the COVID-19 crisis—and to take advantage of its neighbors' current distraction.

    May 5, 2020

  • A rideshare driver wears gloves and a mask while driving following the outbreak of COVID-19, in New York City, March 15, 2020, photo by Jeenah Moon/Reuters

    Commentary

    Non-Emergency Medical Transportation in the Time of COVID-19

    More widespread availability of rideshare for non-emergency medical transport may save lives, reserve emergency resources for those who need them, and provide safe pathways to primary care for the chronically ill. It could also save livelihoods, providing employment in a time of economic hardship.

    May 5, 2020

  • Four hands holding magnifying glasses, photo by solidcolours/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Leading with the Proper Use of Scientific Evidence Is Better Than Hiding Behind It

    Evidence only has scientific meaning when it is part of a body of disciplinary knowledge produced by a community of scientists. Leading with scientific evidence, coupled with a wider values framework, may result in better outcomes for all.

    May 5, 2020

  • COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit, photo by JazzIRT/Getty Images

    Research Brief

    Critical Care Surge Capacity in U.S. Hospitals: Strategies for Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic

    In this brief, the authors present methods for creating critical care surge capacity in hospitals in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and estimate patient capacity, given the number of doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, ventilators, and beds.

    May 5, 2020

  • Members of the Maryland National Guard load medical supplies and equipment at the Maryland Strategic National Stockpile location on March 19, 2020, photo by MSgt. Christopher Schepers/U.S. Air National Guard

    Testimony

    The Federal Research Enterprise and COVID-19

    There is still much to be done to address the COVID-19 pandemic. But it's not too early to examine shortfalls and ways to steer the United States through the crisis. What has been the federal response so far? And what role has the Department of Homeland Security in particular played?

    May 5, 2020

  • A woman waits in front of a closed and shuttered storefront amid the COVID-19 outbreak in Lynn, Massachusetts, May 4, 2020, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Q&A

    Reopening America—The Health and Economic Tradeoffs: Q&A with RAND Experts

    Local and state officials are thinking through whether, when, and how to lift social-distancing restrictions. We asked three RAND researchers about the complex problem of reopening.

    May 4, 2020

  • Joseph Wilkinson does schoolwork at his home in Manchester, Britain, March 23, 2020, photo by Phil Noble/Reuters

    Commentary

    Digital Learning Needs to Benefit All Children When Schools Close

    Three factors are essential for any digital learning method. First, it must be inclusive. Second, it should support the learning experience, not replace it. And third, evidence of what works should inform digital learning interventions.

    May 4, 2020

  • Aerial photograph of the devastation caused in the greater New Orleans area following Hurricane Katrina, August 30, 2005, photo by Vincent Laforet/Pool/Reuters

    Commentary

    Planning for a COVID-19 Hurricane

    What if Hurricane Katrina had hit during a pandemic? Emergency planners can prepare for this scenario by evaluating current response system capacity, evacuation and sheltering procedures, food and supply issues, and more.

    May 4, 2020

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