International Economic Relations

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Increased international trade, and the lowering of barriers to such trade, frequently results in improved international relations, but it can also lead to trade wars and tariff disputes. RAND research explores bilateral and multilateral economic relations; describes how they affect global alliances, globalization, and the economic health of nations; and recommends methods to develop, encourage, and maintain these relations among diverse nations and cultures.

  • An employee works as grains are loaded in a special transport cargo bound for Egypt, in the Black Sea port of Constanta, Romania, May 11, 2022, photo by Olimpiu Gheorghiu/Reuters

    Commentary

    Unblocking the Black Sea for Ukrainian Grain

    Jun 15, 2022

    As Russia has been blockading ports around Odesa, Ukrainian grain exports in May were more than 60 percent lower than a year ago. Global hunger has hit a new high while 22 million tons of grain in Ukraine could rot if not exported soon.

  • People stand in line in front of Huawei's new flagship store, as it officially opens in Shanghai, China, June 24, 2020, photo by Aly Song/Reuters

    Report

    Business Community Support for U.S. Policies Toward China

    May 16, 2022

    Policies implemented by the Trump administration were designed to confront China over its problematic behaviors, such as theft of technology and intellectual property. U.S. businesses agreed with the policies, but questioned some of the tactics used. How can Washington address corporate concerns and still compete against China?

Explore International Economic Relations

  • Report

    Report

    How Will Demographic and Economic Trends in the Arab World Affect U.S. Policy?

    An assessment of likely demographic and economic challenges in the Arab world through 2020—such as population growth rates and continued global oil production—provides a better-informed platform on which to build U.S. defense planning and policy.

    May 11, 2011

  • Report

    Report

    What Do Iranians Think about the U.S., Nuclear Weapons, and Their Economy?

    A new survey of Iranian public opinion finds that a majority of respondents oppose the re-establishment of ties with the United States, and a significant number also support the development of nuclear weapons.

    May 2, 2011

  • Messy pile of U.S. currency

    Commentary

    The Facts About American 'Decline'

    It's fashionable among academics and pundits to proclaim that the U.S. is in decline and no longer No. 1 in the world. The declinists say they are realists. In fact, their alarm is unrealistic, writes Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Apr 13, 2011

  • Dissertation

    Dissertation

    Beyond Rivalry and Camaraderie: Explaining Varying Asian Responses to China

    Assesses the security and economic policy responses of a representative sample of Asian states to China between 1992 and 2008.

    Mar 30, 2011

  • Report

    Report

    Ready for Takeoff: China's Advancing Aerospace Industry

    China's aerospace industry has advanced at an impressive rate over the past decade, partly due to the increasing participation of its aerospace industry in the global commercial aerospace market and the supply chains of the world's leading aerospace firms.

    Mar 24, 2011

  • Report

    Report

    Linkages in World Financial Markets

    Assessing the full consequences of the global financial crisis that began in the summer of 2007 will require years, but it is possible now to examine how short-term linkages in different financial markets have changed since the onset of the crisis.

    Mar 3, 2011

  • Testimony

    Testimony

    Joint Anti-Access Operations: China's "System-of-Systems" Approach

    Testimony presented before the U.S. China Economic and Security Review Commission on January 27, 2011.

    Jan 27, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    China's Next Buying Spree: Foreign Companies

    What is significant about China's acquisitions over the past few years is the change they represent from the negligible amounts in the past, writes Charles Wolf, Jr.

    Jan 24, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Iran Overhauls Subsidies in the Face of Sanctions

    The Iranian regime plans to replace nearly $100 billion of government subsidies on fuel, electricity, and food with more targeted assistance to needy Iranians. If successful, the overhaul would be a major and historic change, one designed to save the government money in the wake of international sanctions, writes Alireza Nader.

    Jan 13, 2011

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Art Sales as Cultural Intelligence: Analysis of the Auction Market for African Tribal Art

    This paper examines auction sales of African tribal art for the continent as a whole and by individual nations of origin.

    Jan 1, 2011

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Collecting Cultural Intelligence: The Tactical Value of Cultural Property

    This paper defines a framework for the collection of cultural intelligence as a fundamental asset in countering threats to cultural security.

    Jan 1, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Punish Iran's Rulers, Not Its People

    As the potential for a diplomatic solution to Iran's nuclear program wanes, the U.S. must consider what steps might dissuade Tehran from continuing its nuclear program without punishing the Iranian people or strengthening those who rule over them, chiefly the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps, writes Alireza Nader.

    Dec 14, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Finding a Solution to Iran

    The revelation of a secret nuclear facility near the holy city of Qom, and the likely existence of other advanced facilities across Iran, makes more urgent the need for a quick solution to the nuclear impasse, writes Alireza Nader.

    Sep 30, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    G-20 Growing Pains

    The increasing importance of the G-20 summits is testimony to the growing role emerging states now play in managing the international economy. But integrating these newcomers into the global community is unlikely to be straightforward or simple, writes Lowell H. Schwartz.

    Sep 24, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Capitalism Still Works: Our Economy Will Recover Because We Are Innovators and Entrepreneurs

    The damage done by the financial crisis now seems to require not a refurbishing job but an extreme makeover. While soul-searching and even self-loathing are inevitable during a crisis, this is no time for America to shy away from a capitalist system that has produced decades of economic growth, writes Krishna Kumar.

    Sep 17, 2009

  • Report

    Report

    China's International Behavior: Activism, Opportunism, and Diversification

    China is a global actor of significant and growing importance, now integrated into the international system and altering that system's dynamics. The complexity of China's ever-changing global activism raises questions about its intentions and the implications for global stability and prosperity.

    Jul 27, 2009

  • Report

    Report

    World Economic Recession Unlikely to Have Lasting Geopolitical Consequences

    Will the current global economic recession have long-term geopolitical implications? Assuming that economic recovery begins in the first half of 2010, lasting structural alterations in the international system — a substantial change in U.S.-China relations, for example — are unlikely. This is because economic performance is only one of many geopolitical elements that shape countries' strategic intent and core external policies.

    Jul 21, 2009

  • News Release

    News Release

    Records from Coalition Provisional Authority Shed Light on Occupation of Iraq

    The record of the U.S.-led Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) in Iraq after the fall of Saddam Hussein compares favorably to that of many other U.S. efforts at post-conflict reconstruction, particularly in the areas of economic and public reforms. However, these achievements were undermined and overshadowed by the U.S. failure to protect the Iraqi population from the criminals and extremists among them who pulled Iraq into civil war.

    May 12, 2009

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    The Future of US-India Relations

    The combination of our largely overlapping vital national interests and shared democratic values should produce a bright future for strategic collaboration between New Delhi and Washington in future decades. But in the immediate period before us, our bilateral ties are likely to be more problematical ...

    May 6, 2009

  • News Release

    News Release

    United States Should Tailor Its Russia Policy to Build on Shared Views and Interests

    The United States has an opportunity to improve relations with Russia and build on shared views and interests, rather than pursue coercive steps that may one day backfire.

    Apr 1, 2009