Military Satellites

  • Report

    Report

    Operational issues for GPS-aided precision missiles

    Operational issues for GPS-aided precision missiles

    Jan 1, 1996

  • GPS illustration

    Report

    Opportunities Created by GPS for U.S. Defense, Commercial, and Foreign Policy Interests

    Since the Global Positioning System (GPS) was originally deployed to aid U.S. armed forces in navigation and position location, it has evolved into a resource supporting civil, scientific, and commercial functions—from air traffic control to the Internet—with precision location and timing information.

    Dec 1, 1995

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    A Policy Direction for the Global Positioning System: Balancing National Security and Commercial Interests

    The evolution of GPS into an information system with a substantial international user community has raised complex policy questions for U.S. decisionmakers on a variety of issues affecting national defense, commerce, and foreign policy.

    Jan 1, 1995

  • Report

    Report

    Modeling Global Positioning System Effects in the TLC/NLC Model

    Presents a design for incorporating Global Positioning System (GPS) into RAND's theater-level combat or nonlinear combat (TLC/NLC) model, which is used for policy analysis of military operations.

    Jan 1, 1994

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    A Rate Integrating Fiber Optic Gyro

    In the past, fiber optic gyros have generally been viewed as angular rate sensors. However, for inertial navigation purposes, a rate integrating gyro characteristic is desired.

    Jun 1, 1991

  • Report

    Report

    Commercial and Military Communication Satellite Acquisition Practices

    ... tests the contention that the commercial sector consistently manages acquisition programs better than the military.

    Jan 1, 1985

  • Report

    Report

    Project Feedback Summary Report: Volume I

    An analysis of the potential of an unconventional reconnaissance method whereby inaccessible points on the earth may be viewed by television from a satellite orbiting at 300-mi altitude. The current code name for this project is "Feed Back."

    Mar 1, 1954

  • Report

    Report

    Project Feedback Summary Report: Volume II

    This volume contains information on the specific design aspects of the Feed Back device.

    Mar 1, 1954

  • A spaceship near a planet

    Report

    Preliminary Design of an Experimental World-Circling Spaceship

    In 1946, more than 11 years before the orbiting of Sputnik, history's first artificial space satellite, Project RAND—then active within Douglas Aircraft Company's Engineering Division—conducted a study on the feasibility of a space vehicle from an engineering standpoint.

    Jul 1, 1946

  • Content

    Content

    Timothy M. Bonds

    Senior Fellow
    Education M.B.A. in business administration, Washington University in St. Louis; M.S. in aero/astro engineering, University of Illinois; B.S. in aero/astro engineering, University of Michigan

  • Content

    Content

    Mel Eisman

    Senior Operations Research/Cost Analyst
    Education M.S.I.E. in operations research, Pennsylvania State University; B.S. in industrial engineering, State University of New York

  • Content

    Content

    Shane Manuel

    Assistant Policy Researcher, RAND; Ph.D. Student, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education M.B.A. in acquisition and contract management, Naval Postgraduate School; B.S. in economics, United States Air Force Academy

  • Content

    Content

    Nicholas A. O'Donoughue

    Senior Engineer
    Education Ph.D. in electrical engineering, Carnegie Mellon University; M.S. in electrical engineering, Carnegie Mellon University; B.S. in computer engineering, Villanova University

  • Content

    Content

    Michelle D. Ziegler

    Technical Analyst
    Education B.S. in astronomy/physics, University of Hawaii; M.S. in astronomy/physics, James Cook University