North Africa

  • Report

    Report

    How Will Demographic and Economic Trends in the Arab World Affect U.S. Policy?

    An assessment of likely demographic and economic challenges in the Arab world through 2020—such as population growth rates and continued global oil production—provides a better-informed platform on which to build U.S. defense planning and policy.

    May 11, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Arab Spring, not Osama bin Laden's Fall, Will Determine Middle East's Fate

    The unanswered question is just what will endure in the Arab world: comparatively peaceful demonstrations leading to regime change, or brutal tactics by authoritarian regimes to crush dissent and cling to power, writes John Parachini.

    May 9, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Is the Arab World Changing for the Better?

    If some measure of democracy does result, the elected governments likely will reflect the popular antipathy that the

    May 3, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    A Recipe for Military Disaster: Mixing Idealism and Realism

    In many cases, idealism and realism conflict, as evidenced by U.S. military interventions over the past four decades, writes Harold Brown.

    Apr 30, 2011

  • Yemen protesters

    Commentary

    Expect Regime Change in Libya, Yemen

    The countries in a possible

    Apr 25, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Time to Arm Libyan Rebels: Here's How

    The long-term objective of a train-and-equip program for the Libyan revolutionary government would be to create a professional military force in a post-Qaddafi Libya that could support democratic institutions free of extremist elements, writes Angel Rabasa.

    Apr 13, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    The Allies in Libya: A New Paradigm for Intervention?

    What has been happening in North Africa this year, in what seems to be the leading edge of a great wind of change sweeping the Arab world, will require the Europeans (along with the U.S. and others) to be deeply and durably engaged there — economically, politically and in humanitarian terms, writes Robert E. Hunter.

    Apr 10, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Obama's Calculated Gamble on Libya Strategy

    Pushing the European allies, especially Britain and France, to take more responsibility in managing crises would reduce the costs and burdens on the United States while providing an incentive for the Europeans to take defense more seriously, writes F. Stephen Larrabee.

    Apr 4, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Arm the Libyan Rebels to Fight Gadhafi

    What the United States did in Bosnia might hold the key for an effective response to the crisis in Libya, writes Angel Rabasa.

    Mar 24, 2011

  • An Afghan National Interpreter and U.S. Army soldier talk with an Afghan boy during a patrol at a bazaar in the Zabul province of Afghanistan June 29, 2010

    Commentary

    What Intervention Looks Like

    The question, then, is whether stopping the fighting—which could also require forcibly removing Qaddafi—is worth the price of deep military engagement and responsibility for Libya's postwar future, writes Robert E. Hunter.

    Mar 16, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Thinking Twice about Libyan Engagement

    We have learned over the past couple of decades that it is deceptively easy for the world's only superpower to topple objectionable regimes—but a good deal harder to replace them with something better, writes James Dobbins.

    Mar 15, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Five Myths about the Muslim Brotherhood

    Much of what we know—or think we know—about the Muslim Brotherhood's ambitions, beliefs and history is clouded by misperceptions, writes Lorenzo Vidino.

    Mar 6, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Can You Hear Libya Now?

    The U.S. and its allies could help Libyans communicate with the outside world by deploying cellphone base stations on aircraft or tethered balloons, write Dan Gonzales and Sarah Harting.

    Mar 4, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Libya's Terra Incognita: Who and What Will Follow Qaddafi?

    The new, post-Qaddafi era is likely to be marked by the emergence of long-suppressed domestic groups jostling for supremacy in what is sure to be a chaotic political scene, writes Frederic Wehrey.

    Feb 28, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Egypt Faces Rough, Unchartered Road

    The most favorable outcome achievable in Egypt might be what we see in Iraq, but without the violence, writes Harold Brown.

    Feb 22, 2011

  • Call with the Experts

    Multimedia

    Julie Taylor Discusses Post-Mubarak Egypt and Middle East

    Senior political scientist Julie Taylor spoke with RAND media relations director Jeffrey Hiday about the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and the effects it could have on other Middle East countries and U.S. relations with the region.

    Feb 11, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Keep U.S. Aid Flowing to Egypt's Military

    Continuing support for the Egyptian military will be crucial for U.S. influence and for an evolution in Egypt that can meet American interests, writes Robert E. Hunter.

    Feb 9, 2011

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    The Domino Effect of Arab Unrest

    There is no clear political party or leader ready to step in if the regime in Egypt falls. However, this protest is not without leadership; it is spearheaded by a large network of Egyptian human rights groups and other citizens, writes Julie Taylor.

    Feb 1, 2011

  • Report

    Report

    International Comparison of Ten Medical Regulatory Systems: Egypt, Germany, Greece, India, Italy, Nigeria, Pakistan, Poland, South Africa and Spain

    This study was commissioned by the UK General Medical Council (GMC) to provide an evidence base on the systems of medical regulation in place in the countries of origin of doctors seeking to enter the UK and obtain registration to practise.

    May 18, 2009

  • Report

    Report

    History of Egyptian Grassroots Political Reform Movement Provides Insight Into Reform Efforts

    The Kefaya Movement, an indigenous effort for political reform organized in Egypt, provides policymakers with an example of the challenges grassroots organizations in the Arab world face as they try to implement democracy and political reform. In late 2004, Kefaya was able to mobilize wide segments of Egyptian society.

    Oct 26, 2008

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