Recidivism

Featured

Recidivism—the act of repeating an undesirable behavior despite having suffered negative consequences for that behavior—is most often associated with criminal behavior and substance abuse. RAND research explores how to reduce reoffending among former convicts in the adult and juvenile justice systems.

  • Prisoners gather around a computer following a graduation ceremony from a computer coding program at San Quentin State Prison in San Quentin, California April 20, 2015

    Report

    Higher Education Programs in Prison Reduce Recidivism

    Aug 28, 2019

    Evidence shows that correctional education programs are effective—and cost-effective—at improving employment outcomes for participants and at helping to keep them from returning to prison. But given limited budgets, how can the long-term funding of these programs be sustained?

  • A man shakes a woman's hand at a job fair in Clarksville, Tennessee, March 6, 2020, photo by Casey Williams/Clarksville Now

    Research Brief

    A More Accurate Way to Predict Recidivism Risk in Background Checks

    Jan 6, 2022

    Roughly 30 percent of people in the United States have criminal histories, so exclusions resulting from background checks can foreclose job and other opportunities for many. But what if it were possible to show that some people pose a low risk of recidivism?

Explore Recidivism

  • People

    People

    Marika Booth

    Statistical Analyst
    Education M.S. in biostatistics, University of California at Los Angeles

  • People

    People

    Shawn D. Bushway

    Senior Policy Researcher
    Education Ph.D. in public policy analysis and political economy, Carnegie Mellon University; B.S. in mathematics, University of Notre Dame