The Elderly

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    The Role of Early-Life Educational Quality and Literacy in Explaining Racial Disparities in Cognition in Late Life

    Racial disparities in late-life cognition persist even after accounting for educational attainment. We examined whether early-life educational quality and literacy in later life help explain these disparities.

    Jan 1, 2014

  • Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks at the G8 Dementia Summit

    Commentary

    A Global Focus on Dementia

    The Group of 8 industrial nations is convening a special session to seek an international approach to dementia research at a time the disease is being recognized as a 21st century global health crisis of historic proportions.

    Dec 11, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Predictors of Treatment Response to Brief Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia (BBTI) in Older Adults

    Patients with insomnia who have greater distress at baseline or prolonged sleep latency are more likely to show positive response to BBTI.

    Dec 1, 2013

  • A younger man helping an elderly man who is using a walker

    Solution

    Planning for the Rising Costs of Dementia

    Dementia is a chronic disease of aging that reduces cognitive function, leaving people unable to tend to even their most basic, everyday needs. A RAND-led research team developed the most precise estimate to date of the economic burden of the disease.

    Nov 20, 2013

  • An elderly woman using a walker with a young woman assisting her

    Blog

    RAND Summer Institute July 7–10, 2014

    Applications are being accepted now through March 21 for the 21st annual RAND Summer Institute (RSI), a pair of conferences on aging that will be held next July 7–10 at the RAND Corporation headquarters in Santa Monica.

    Oct 22, 2013

  • grandfather and granddaughter

    Journal Article

    Benefits of Slowing the Aging Process

    Most medical research focuses on fighting individual disease. But delayed aging could boost life expectancy by more than two years and yield more than $7 trillion over 50 years. Greater investment in research to delay aging could be a very efficient way to prevent disease, improve public health, and extend healthy life.

    Oct 1, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    SCOPE: A Scorecard for Osteoporosis in Europe

    The scorecard summarises key indicators of the burden of osteoporosis and its management in each of the member states of the European Union.

    Sep 23, 2013

  • hands on walker

    Research Brief

    Major Changes to Medicare Would Cut Costs, Squeeze Enrollment, Raise Spending for Seniors

    Potential policy changes, such as raising the eligibility age of Medicare from 65 to 67, would save Medicare from $400 billion to $4 trillion between 2012 and 2036 but would also reduce the number of seniors enrolled.

    Aug 26, 2013

  • Periodical

    Periodical

    RAND Review: Vol. 37, No. 1, Summer 2013

    Stories discuss the harms caused by sexual assault in the military; the prospects for minimalist international interventions; cyber threats and nations' responses to them; and the rising costs of dementia in the United States.

    Jul 15, 2013

  • elderly person's hands on walking cane

    Testimony

    The Monetary Costs of Dementia in the United States

    How do today's costs for treating patients with Alzheimer's disease compare to those of decades past?

    Jul 12, 2013

  • An elderly Mexican woman

    Solution

    Reducing Poverty Among Mexico's Elderly

    Mexico is undergoing unprecedented demographic changes and advancements that have raised life expectancy, but a larger percentage of Mexico's elderly is poor and rural, and many lack the social safety nets available to urban seniors. An experiment to reform to Mexico's social security system is helping to alleviate political and social instability.

    Jul 1, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Patterns of Older Americans' Health Care Utilization Over Time

    Older individuals' health and changes in health are more strongly correlated with persistence of and changes in care-seeking behavior over time than are financial status and changes in financial status.

    Jun 14, 2013

  • News Release

    News Release

    Strategies Could Curb Medicare Costs, but Also Drive Seniors Out of Insurance Program

    The rising cost of Medicare can be cut through strategies such as increasing premiums and raising the eligibility age, but those moves could drive many elderly Americans from the program, leaving them with limited access to health services.

    May 6, 2013

  • Couple reviewing finances with an advisor

    Commentary

    The Cost of Dementia: Who Will Pay?

    It is time for the government in partnership with industry to return to the drawing board to craft a plan that will provide protection for the more than 9 million people who will need care for dementia by 2040, writes Michael D. Hurd.

    May 1, 2013

  • Doctor examining female senior patient with elbow pain

    Journal Article

    Strategies Could Curb Medicare Costs, but Also Drive Seniors Out of the Program

    The rising cost of Medicare can be cut through strategies such as increasing premiums and raising the eligibility age, but those moves could drive many elderly Americans from the program, leaving them with limited access to health services.

    May 1, 2013

  • Young woman and grandfather sitting hand in hand at table

    Commentary

    Dementia's Growing Cost to Caregivers

    At the rate that the U.S. population is aging, the total cost of dementia could reach half a trillion dollars a year by 2040. Those who care for impaired relatives and friends are acutely aware of the effects of dementia, and unfortunately they are all too familiar with its costs, writes Kathleen J. Mullen.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • an elderly woman with a caretaker

    Testimony

    The Monetary Costs of Dementia in the United States

    Identifying the costs of dementia is challenging because persons who have it are likely to have co-existing chronic health problems, making isolating the costs among other costs difficult. Also, it is unclear how to attribute a monetary cost to informal caregiving.

    Apr 24, 2013

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Trends in Late-Life Activity Limitations in the United States: An Update from Five National Surveys

    This article updates trends from five national U.S. surveys to determine whether the prevalence of activity limitations among the older population continued to decline in the first decade of the twenty-first century.

    Apr 1, 2013

  • Migrant workers load cucumbers into a truck in Blackwater, Virginia

    Journal Article

    Retirement and Health Benefits for Mexican Migrant Workers Returning from the United States

    Mexican migrants who have spent at least a year in the United States before returning home are less likely to have public health insurance or social security benefits, and could be more vulnerable to poverty in old age.

    Apr 1, 2013

  • an elderly couple, man possibly with dementia

    Journal Article

    Cost of Dementia Tops $159 Billion Annually in the United States

    The monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges from $159 billion to $215 billion annually, making the disease more costly to the nation than either heart disease or cancer. The greatest cost is associated with providing institutional and home-based long-term care rather than medical services.

    Apr 1, 2013