Vaccination

Featured

Vaccination has eradicated many of the world's most deadly infectious diseases and is used to prevent childhood diseases, highly contagious diseases such as COVID-19 and influenza, and viruses causing dangerous, chronic conditions such as hepatitis. Much of RAND's research on vaccination focuses on identifying barriers to immunization, determining strategies to promote vaccination, and studying the impact of vaccines on health in the United States and globally.

  • A girl getting a COVID-19 vaccination, photo by valentinrussanov/Getty Images

    Report

    How to Boost COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance in the United States

    Sep 9, 2021

    Vaccine hesitancy is a major challenge to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Reaching herd immunity will require boosting confidence in the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines, combatting complacency about the pandemic, and increasing the convenience of getting vaccinated.

  • Nurse Pamela Omboko prepares a Malaria vaccine for infants at a clinic in Gem, Siaya County, Kenya, October 7, 2021, photo by James Keyi/Reuters

    Commentary

    Malaria Vaccine May Not Eliminate Need to Combat Counterfeit Medicines

    Nov 8, 2021

    The newly announced malaria vaccine could be a critical tool to combat the tremendous socioeconomic burden malaria causes. But global achievements in reducing malaria cases and deaths in the past decades may be in danger of significant reversal if the problem of counterfeiting continues.

Explore Vaccination

  • An empty classroom at Heather Hills Elementary School in Bowie, Md., on August 26, 2020, photo by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Sipa USA via Reuters

    Report

    What Parents Think About Kids Returning to Classrooms

    As of May 2021, 84 percent of parents surveyed plan to send their children to school in person in the fall. Black and Hispanic parents are the most hesitant. Two-thirds of parents want to keep COVID-19 school safety measures in place, but only 52 percent plan to have their kids vaccinated.

    Jun 10, 2021

  • Blog

    Reopening the U.S. Economy, Geoengineering, 5G: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on the potential effects of reopening the economy before the White House's vaccination goal is met, students' learning experiences during the pandemic, competition in the 5G era, and more.

    May 28, 2021

  • A child getting a routine vaccination, photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

    News Release

    Evaluation of Safety Studies Affirms That Vaccines Are Safe for Children and Adults

    A new study looking across a large body of research finds further evidence for the safety of vaccines that are Food and Drug Administration–approved and routinely recommended for children, adults, and pregnant women. The study updates a vaccine safety review that was released in 2014.

    May 26, 2021

  • A healthcare worker holds syringes with COVID-19 vaccines at a vaccination center, in El Paso, Texas, May 6, 2021, photo by Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

    Commentary

    Will the United States Declare Freedom from COVID-19 Too Soon?

    RAND analyzed what could happen with COVID-19 deaths in the United States if restrictions all go away on July 4. Fully reopening the economy before Biden's vaccination target was met doubled the average number of COVID-19 deaths between Independence Day and the end of the year.

    May 21, 2021

  • Blog

    Vaccine Hesitancy, Working from Home, Arctic Diplomacy: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on vaccine hesitancy as a symptom of ‘Truth Decay,’ how to make remote work beneficial for all, U.S. Arctic diplomacy, and more.

    May 21, 2021

  • Vials with Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine labels, March 19, 2021, photo by Dado Ruvic/Reuters

    Commentary

    Vaccine Patents Debate Risks Becoming a Sideshow

    As COVID-19 cases continue to surge around the world, the debate is raging over whether patents on existing vaccines should be waived. But the global community could view patent waivers as just one of many available tools for speeding up vaccine delivery worldwide.

    May 17, 2021

  • A health care worker from the El Paso Fire Department administers a COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination center in El Paso, Texas, May 7, 2021, photo by Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

    Commentary

    How Truth Decay Is Fueling Vaccine Hesitancy

    A recent poll found that more than a quarter of Americans will not try to get vaccinated. The spread of misinformation and disinformation, which is rampant over social media, is one of the factors fueling vaccine hesitancy. And in turn, it's threatening our ability to end the pandemic for good.

    May 14, 2021

  • Margaret Keenan, 90, receives Britain's first Pfizer/BioNtech COVID-19 vaccination at University Hospital in Coventry, UK, December 8, 2020, photo by Jacob King/Pool via Reuters

    Commentary

    The Pivotal Role of Remote Working in the Journey to Jab the Nation

    Pulling the UK COVID-19 vaccination program together was an immense logistical and technical effort. Had it not been for the working practices mandated by the lockdown, it would have been even more difficult. What changed over the pandemic to allow this to happen?

    May 13, 2021

  • Blog

    The Uyghurs, Getting the World Vaccinated, Policing in America: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on China's disappeared Uyghurs, how the United States can help get the rest of the world vaccinated, what's next for policing in America, and more.

    May 7, 2021

  • Workers stand near the first shipment of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine delivered under the COVAX scheme, at Benito Juarez's International Airport in Mexico City, Mexico, April 22, 2021, photo by Henry Romero/Reuters

    Commentary

    America Could Do More to Get the World Vaccinated

    After waging its own withering battle with COVID-19, the United States appears to be coming to grips with the pandemic and its economy is recovering. Now could be the time for America to play a greater role in global vaccination, both out of generosity and self-interest.

    May 4, 2021

  • People pose for a photo after being vaccinated at the FEMA-supported COVID-19 vaccination site at Valencia State College in Orlando, Florida, photo by Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/Sipa USA/Reuters

    Report

    Messaging Strategies to Mitigate COVID-19

    Public health officials are trying to convince a majority of Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19, while also promoting other disease-mitigating measures such as mask-wearing. What messaging strategies might help this effort?

    Apr 30, 2021

  • President Joe Biden addresses a joint session of Congress, with Vice President Kamala Harris and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi behind him, Washington, D.C., April 28, 2021, photo by Melina Mara/Reuters

    Blog

    Biden's First Address to Congress: Insights from RAND

    President Joe Biden addressed a joint session of Congress, summarizing his administration's early COVID-19 response and outlining plans that aim to loosen the pandemic's year-long grip on a weary nation. The speech reflected the fact that the United States faces policy challenges across a wide range of domains.

    Apr 29, 2021

  • Denise Gregory, a staff member at Crown Heights Center for Nursing and Rehabilitation, a nursing home facility, receives the COVID-19 vaccine from Walgreens Pharmacist Annette Marshall, in Brooklyn, New York, December 22, 2020, photo by Yuki Iwamura/Reuters

    Multimedia

    COVID-19 Vaccine Liability and Compensation in the United States

    This RAND Corporation virtual event explored how those who believe that they have been injured by COVID-19 vaccines in the United States can seek compensation and how the two federal compensation systems for people harmed by vaccines differ.

    Apr 29, 2021

  • Dissertation

    Dissertation

    Dissemination of Vaccine Misinformation on Twitter and Its Countermeasures

    Employs state-of-the-art machine learning models to collect the first dataset of vaccine misinformation from Twitter disseminated from January 2018 to April 2019 and proposes plausible actions.

    Apr 21, 2021

  • Blog

    COVID-19 Demographic Trends, Vaccinating 'High-Contact' People, the Iran Threat Network: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how the pandemic is shaping demographic trends, targeting vaccines to "high-contact" people, the Iran Threat Network, and more.

    Apr 16, 2021

  • Nurse practitioner Lisa Flemmons and chief nursing officer Robin L. Steaban give a thumbs up after Flemmons received a COVID-19 vaccine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, December 17, 2020, photo by George Walker IV/USA Today via Reuters

    Commentary

    Who Can Effectively Champion the Vax?

    Vaccine hesitancy appears to be one more hurdle in ending the COVID-19 pandemic. The CDC would typically lead a campaign to overcome it, but Americans' trust in the CDC has declined measurably. Health care professionals may be more effective messengers when it comes to COVID-19 vaccines.

    Apr 9, 2021

  • Nurse Nicole McCurrach draws up COVID-19 vaccinations at Richmond raceway in Richmond, Virginia, March 4, 2021, photo by Julia Rendleman/Reuters

    Commentary

    Target Vaccine to 'High-Contact' People

    Actively seeking out people with lots of contacts for vaccination could bring the epidemic under control much more quickly than vaccinating people at random. Vaccinating just 15 percent of the population would be enough to crush the epidemic—so long as it was the right 15 percent.

    Apr 9, 2021

  • News Release

    News Release

    Public Trust of the Centers for Disease Control Falls During Coronavirus Pandemic

    Public trust in the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has fallen during the coronavirus pandemic, with the decline bringing overall population-level trust in the agency to the same lower level of trust long held by Black Americans about the agency.

    Apr 5, 2021

  • The exterior of the Tom Harkin Global Communications Center, otherwise known as Building 19, located on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Roybal Campus in Atlanta, Georgia.

    Report

    Trust in the CDC Declined During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    From May to October 2020, some Americans lost trust in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The drop in trust was particularly significant among people who intended to vote for a candidate other than Joe Biden in the 2020 election or did not intend to vote at all. This suggests that views of the CDC are now strongly politicized.

    Apr 5, 2021

  • Blog

    Game Theory to Help the Vaccine Rollout, Abraham Accords, Telehealth: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on how game theory can help the COVID-19 vaccine rollout, potential economic benefits of the Abraham Accords, telemedicine use during the pandemic, and more.

    Mar 19, 2021

Research conducted by