Weapons of Mass Destruction

A weapon of mass destruction (WMD) is a weapon — be it nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, or explosive — that can kill or injure large numbers of people or greatly damage the infrastructure of a country or region. RAND provides policymakers with objective guidance and recommendations to improve WMD preparedness, detection, and response, as well as international collaboration to counter WMD threats.

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Why We Didn't Get the Picture

    Published commentary by RAND staff.

    Feb 1, 2004

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    The Decision for War Was Still Right

    commentaries by RAND Staff: insightful commentaries on current events, published in newspapers, magazines and journals worldwide.

    Jul 18, 2003

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    N. Korea's Threat to S. Korea

    Published commentary by RAND staff.

    Mar 7, 2003

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Forum: What's a 'Just War' These Days?

    As we move from theory toward practice, Terrence K. Kelly re-examines the standards for an era of prolific weapons of mass destruction.

    Feb 16, 2003

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    War or Peace? Why, for Now, There Will Be No War with Iraq

    commentaries by RAND Staff: Why, for now, there will be no war with Iraq.

    Jan 19, 2003

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Iraq's Had Time to Really Hide Its Weapons Sites

    Published commentary by RAND staff.

    Sep 19, 2002

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Sitting on the Sidelines Isn't Good Enough

    Published commentary by RAND staff.

    Mar 11, 2002

  • Commentary

    Commentary

    Osama Bin Laden--Not Wanted: Dead or Alive

    Turning the next phase of this conflict into the most expensive manhunt in history might well divert attention and needed resources from what should be the war's central aim: to defeat Al Qaeda before it mounts an attack with a weapon of mass destruction.

    Dec 30, 2001

  • Report

    Report

    Nonproliferation Sanctions

    This study examines the United States' use of sanctions against foreign entities to prevent the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons.

    Jan 1, 2001

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Good Disarmament -And Bad

    There are several roads to, and several kinds of, disarmanent.

    Jan 1, 1961

  • People

    People

    Bruce W. Bennett

    Adjunct International/Defense Researcher; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
    Education Ph.D. in policy analysis, Pardee RAND Graduate School; B.S. in economics, California Institute of Technology

  • People

    People

    Thomas F. Atkin

    Adjunct Management Scientist
    Education M.S. in management science, University of Miami; B.S. in mathematical science, U.S. Coast Guard Academy

  • People

    People

    Brandon Corbin

    Defense Analyst
    Education M.A. in security studies, Georgetown University; B.S. in engineering management, US Mil Academy at West Point

  • People

    People

    Natasha Lander

    Senior Policy Analyst
    Education M.P.P. in national security policy, George Mason University; B.S. in journalism and political science, Bowling Green State University

  • People

    People

    Karl P. Mueller

    Senior Political Scientist
    Education Ph.D. in politics, Princeton University; B.A. in political science, University of Chicago

  • People

    People

    Annette Prieto

    Technical Analyst
    Education Master of Science in biodefense, George Mason University; Bachelor of Science in microbiology and immunology, University of Miami

  • People

    People

    Chandler Sachs

    Research Assistant
    Education B.S. in interdisciplinary studies, Cornell University