Work-Family Conflicts

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  • Woman works at home while her children play video games, photo by filadendron/Getty Images

    Commentary

    COVID-19 Gave Managers a Look at Our Home Lives. Will They Now Penalize Women?

    Dec 14, 2020

    The pandemic gave managers a window into the struggles of working women. What will they do with this information? Will they accommodate women by making exceptions to their established norms? Or will they do the harder work of remaking their culture so women are no longer the exception?

  • Mother working on a laptop while holding her  baby, photo by monkeybusinessimages/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Helping Mothers Return to Work Is a Gender Equality Issue

    Jan 21, 2021

    Employers and policymakers play a crucial role in ensuring that women are not unnecessarily disadvantaged when they have children. Policies such as access to family leave, job protection, and childcare options can play a large role.

Explore Work-Family Conflicts

  • A business woman working at a laptop in an office

    Research Brief

    How Do Americans Perceive the Workplace?

    For many Americans, the workplace is hectic, hazardous, and physically demanding. But many retirees would still consider rejoining the workforce if the right opportunity came along.

    Aug 14, 2017

  • People working at a stressful customer service call center

    Report

    U.S. Workplace Is Physically and Emotionally Taxing

    Americans face unpleasant and potentially hazardous working conditions, physical exertion, unstable schedules, and have to work during their free time. Despite these challenges, they have some autonomy, most feel confident about their skill set, and many receive social support on the job.

    Aug 14, 2017

  • News Release

    News Release

    American Workplace Is Physically and Emotionally Taxing; Most Workers Receive Support from Boss and Friends at Work

    The American workplace is taxing, with workers facing unstable work schedules, unpleasant and hazardous working conditions, and an often hostile social environment. But American workers have a certain degree of autonomy on the job, feel confident about their skill set, and receive social support while on the job.

    Aug 13, 2017

  • A father feeding his newborn baby

    Commentary

    Why Europe's Work-Life Balance Proposal Could Be in Limbo for Years

    The work-life balance proposal has a chance of having an impact on the labor markets and welfare systems in Europe. However, given the variation in policies across member states and levels of political support among key stakeholders, the proposal may end up stuck in negotiations.

    May 30, 2017

  • Mother holding her baby while working from home

    Commentary

    Is It Time to Extend Maternity Leave Across Europe?

    Any policy solution for extending maternity leave must strike a balance between protecting infant health through extended breastfeeding and mitigating any potentially negative impact on the mother's career progression or increased costs to business.

    Sep 13, 2016

  • Woman feeding baby while using laptop and talking on phone

    Commentary

    UK and Europe Are Behind the Times for Single Mothers and Their Children

    Single parents head 10.4 percent of households with children across Europe — 20.4 percent in the UK — and the socioeconomic gap between single- and two-parent households continues to grow. Accessible and flexible work policies are needed to improve employment conditions for single parents, especially mothers.

    Mar 11, 2015

  • London commuters

    Commentary

    Seven Chances to Meet Europe's Employment Targets

    The EU will fail to meet the Europe 2020 Strategy target of having 75 percent of people between the ages of 20 and 64 in work unless enough women are encouraged to enter, or remain in, the workforce. Here are seven factors the new EU Commissioners responsible for gender equality and employment must address.

    Oct 30, 2014

  • Report

    Report

    Gender equality in the workforce: Reconciling work, private and family life in Europe

    This short statistical paper examines two specific aspects of the question: (i) the emerging trends in couples' earnings structures; and (ii) the extent to which more equal earnings relates to more equal domestic work contributions.

    Oct 29, 2014

  • Report

    Report

    Family-related working schedule flexibility across Europe: Short Statistical Report No. 6

    Access to increased work schedule flexibility varies across EU Member States Greater flexibility is reported in affluent countries and differences also emerge between social groups across countries.

    Oct 29, 2014

  • Report

    Caring for Children in Europe: How Childcare, Parental Leave, and Flexible Working Arrangements Interact in Europe

    Most parents in Europe combine a variety of methods to reconcile their working lives with childcare duties, and their arrangements are related to their preferences, the age of their children, and the labour market opportunities to which they have access.

    Jun 12, 2014

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Access to Leave Benefits for Primary Caregivers of Children with Special Health Care Needs: A Double Bind

    We examined whether access to benefits varies by level of childcare responsibilities among employed parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN).

    Jan 1, 2013

  • Report

    Report

    Measuring Underemployment Among Military Spouses

    Comparisons of military wives with a group of similar civilian wives show that the former have a much greater tendency to be underemployed. However, there does not seem to be a strong link between military wives' labor force position and satisfaction with their life situation.

    Feb 16, 2010

  • News Release

    News Release

    Military Child Care System Should Reassess Delivery of Services to Better Meet Goals

    The U.S. military should reassess its child care system to look for ways to make it better fit the needs of military families and more effectively meet recruitment, readiness and retention goals.

    Sep 29, 2008

  • News Release

    News Release

    Better Access to Federal and Employer-Provided Time Off Helps Working Parents of Chronically Ill Children

    Working parents are more able to care for their chronically ill children when given greater access to federal and employer-provided time off from their jobs, according to a RAND Corporation study issued today.

    Jun 21, 2007

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Why Wait? The Effect of Marriage and Childbearing on the Wages of Men and Women

    The authors use data from the earlier and later cohorts of the NLSY to estimate the effect of marriage and childbearing on wages. Estimates imply that marriage lowers female wages 2-4 percent in the year of marriage. Marriage also lowers the wage growth of men and women by about two and four percentage points, respectively. A first birth lowers female wages 2-3 percent, but has no effect on wage growth. Male wages are unaffected by childbearing. Findings suggest that early marriage and childbearing can lead to substantial decreases in lifetime earnings.

    Jan 1, 2007

  • Research Brief

    Research Brief

    Job Continuity Among New Mothers

    Argue it is unlikely that maternity-leave legislation will have a major effect on job continuity for working mothers, since the attractiveness of a given job may change after a woman gives birth (e.g., such women may want jobs with flexible hours).

    Jan 1, 2000

  • Report

    Report

    Job Continuity Among New Mothers

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, the authors correlate work status after childbirth with work status before pregnancy to estimate the prevalence, before maternity-leave legislation, of returns to the preleave employer.

    Jan 1, 2000

  • People

    People

    Giulia Lanfredi

    Research Assistant
    Education M.Sc. in gender, policy and inequalities, London School of Economics and Political Science; M.Sc. in economics and management in art, culture, media and enterainment, Bocconi University; B.Sc. in economics and management for art, culture and communication, Bocconi University

  • People

    People

    Madeline Nightingale

    Senior Analyst
    Education D.Phil. in social policy, University of Oxford; M.Sc. in comparative social policy, University of Oxford; B.Sc. in social anthropology, London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE)