Bios of 2013 RSI and Mini-Med School Participants

Daniel Benjamin

Cornell University

http://economics.cornell.edu/dbenjamin/

Daniel Benjamin is a behavioral economist: his research incorporates ideas and methods from psychology into economic analysis. Some current research topics include understanding errors people make in statistical reasoning; exploring how best to use survey measures of subjective well-being (such as happiness and life satisfaction) to construct a "well-being index"; and investigating how genetic data could be used into economic research. Other ongoing work addresses how economic behavior relates to cognitive ability and social identity (ethnicity, race, gender, and religion).

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Patricia Boyle

Rush University Medical Center

http://www.rush.edu/rumc/page-1116015702024.html

Patricia Boyle, PhD, is a neuropsychologist with the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center and associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Boyle's primary interest is the prevention of age-related cognitive and functional decline and dementia. Her research examines risk factors for and the neuropathologic basis of age related changes in cognition, decision making and physical function. The goal of this research is to identify factors that promote health and well being in late life. Dr. Boyle has published extensively in the areas of cognitive aging, Alzheimer's disease and functional status, and her research is funded by the National Institute on Aging.

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David Bloom and David Canning

Harvard University

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/david-bloom/ and http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/david-canning/

Dr. David E. Bloom is Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography in the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Bloom is an economist whose work focuses on health, demography, education, and labor. In recent years, he has written extensively on primary, secondary, and tertiary education in developing countries and on the links among health status, population dynamics, and economic growth. Dr. Bloom has published over 300 articles, book chapters, and books.

Dr. David Canning is the Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences, and Professor of Economics and International Health in the Department of Global Health and Population of the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Canning also serves as the Deputy Director of the Program on the Global Demography of Aging. His research on demographic change focuses on the effect of changes in age structure on aggregate economic activity, and the effect of changes in longevity on economic behavior. His research also explores health as a form of human capital and its effect on worker productivity.

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Judith Campisi

Buck Institute for Research on Aging/ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

http://www.buckinstitute.org/campisiLab

Dr. Judith Campisi is a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a Professor at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. Early in her career, Dr. Campisi became interested in the control of cellular senescence and its role in tumor suppression and aging. Since then, she has established a broad research program to understand various aspects of aging, with an emphasis on the interface between cancer and aging. Her laboratory has made several pioneering discoveries in these areas, and her research continues to challenge and alter existing paradigms.

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Steve Cole

University of California, Los Angeles

http://people.healthsciences.ucla.edu/institution/personnel?personnel_id=45359

Dr. Steve Cole is a Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences in the UCLA School of Medicine. His research uses computational bioinformatics to map the biological pathways by which social environments influence gene expression by viral, cancer, and immune cell genomes. Dr. Cole is a member of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UCLA Molecular Biology Institute, director of the UCLA Social Genomics Core Laboratory and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Elissa Epel

University of California, San Francisco

http://psych.ucsf.edu/faculty.aspx?id=616

Elissa Epel is an associate professor in the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. She is also a faculty member in the Health Psychology Postdoctoral Program, the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, the Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Postdoctoral Scholars Program, and a leader of the new UCSF Center on Obesity Assessment, Study, and Treatment (COAST). She has longstanding interests in social and psychobiological stress mechanisms, and impact of stress physiology on food intake, insulin resistance, obesity, and premature aging at the cellular level.

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Caleb Finch

University of Southern California

http://www.usc.edu/dept/gero/faculty/Finch/

Dr. Caleb Finch is a Professor of Gerontology and Biological Sciences, and founding member of the Departments of Molecular Biology and Neurobiology at USC, where he also holds adjunct appointments in the Departments of Psychology, Physiology and Neurology. Dr. Finch also founded USC’s NIA-funded Alzheimer Disease Research Center in 1984 and currently serves as its Co-Director. Dr. Finch’s research interests include the study of basic mechanisms in the human biology of aging, the evolution of human lifespan, and more recently, the effect of air pollution on brain development and aging. He has received most of the major awards in biomedical gerontology, including the Robert W. Kleemeier Award of the Gerontological Society of America, the Sandoz Premier prize by the International Geriatric Association, and the Irving Wright Award of the American Federation for Aging Research and the Research Award of the American Aging Association.

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Fred Gage

Salk Institute for Biological Studies

http://www.salk.edu/faculty/gage.html

Dr. Fred Gage is a professor in the Laboratory of Genetics and the Vi and John Adler Chair for Research on Age-Related Neurodegenerative Disease at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Dr. Gage is a Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences and past president of the Society for Neuroscience and the International Society for Stem Cell Research. His work focuses on the adult central nervous system and the unexpected plasticity and adaptability found throughout the life of all animals. His lab showed that humans are capable of growing new nerve cells throughout the life cycle. Immature nerve cells are found in the adult brain, and Dr. Gage is working to explore how these cells can be induced to become mature functioning cells.

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John Haaga

National Institute on Aging

http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/dbsr/john-haaga-phd

John Haaga is the deputy director of Behavioral and Social Research and chief of the Population and Social Processes Branch at NIA. His focus is on the demography of aging; biodemography; and social networks, neighborhoods, and built environments. Haaga received his Ph.D. from the RAND Graduate School in 1982.

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Orla Hayden

RAND
 

Orla Hayden is a research programmer working on Labor and Population projects with the RAND Center for the Study of Aging, which conducts objective, independent, behavioral research on the elderly population. These projects require a wide range of skills from data management, cleaning and variable derivation to statistical analysis of massive datasets. She leads a team of programmers who take the American Life Panel data and create a comparable RAND HRS ALP dataset. This dataset contains the same derived variables as the older, over 51 population found in the RAND HRS data.

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Margie Lachman

Brandeis University

http://www.brandeis.edu/departments/psych/lachman/people/index.html

Margie E. Lachman, Ph.D. is Minnie and Harold L. Fierman Professor of Psychology and Director of the Lifespan Developmental Psychology Lab at Brandeis University and the Brandeis University Lifespan Initiative on Healthy Aging. She is co-director of the NIH-funded pre and postdoctoral training program, Cognitive Aging in a Social Context.

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David Laibson

Harvard University

http://scholar.harvard.edu/laibson

David Laibson is the Robert I. Goldman Professor of Economics at Harvard University. Laibson is also a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research, where he is Research Associate in the Asset Pricing, Economic Fluctuations, and Aging Working Groups. Laibsonʼs research focuses on the topic of behavioral economics, and he leads Harvard Universityʼs Foundations of Human Behavior Initiative.

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Kenneth Langa

University of Michigan

http://sitemaker.umich.edu/klanga/biography

Kenneth Langa is a Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine and Institute for Social Research, a Research Scientist in the Veterans Affairs HSR&D Center for Clinical Management Research, and an Associate Director of the Institute of Gerontology, all at the University of Michigan. He is also Associate Director of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a National Institute on Aging funded longitudinal study of 20,000 adults in the United States.

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Mary Beth Ofstedal

University of Michigan

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/people/profile/336/Mary_Beth_Ofstedal

Mary Beth Ofstedal is a Research Scientist with the Population Studies Center and the Survey Research Center. Her research interests include transitions in physical and cognitive functioning in old-age, issues relating to access and utilization of health and long-term care services, intergenerational relations and support, methodological issues in survey research, longitudinal survey design and analysis, and comparative research.

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Sam Preston

University of Pennsylvania

http://sociology.sas.upenn.edu/samuel_preston

Sam Preston's major research interest is in the health of populations. He has written primarily about mortality trends and patterns in large aggregates, including twentieth century mortality transitions and black/white differentials in the United States. Recent research has focused on the mortality effects of cigarette smoking and obesity in developed countries. Two papers with Dana Glei and John Wlimoth use data for 21 countries for the past 60 years to demonstrate the relationship between lung cancer deaths and deaths from other causes. This relationship enables improved calculations of deaths attributable to smoking.

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Felipe Sierra

National Institute on Aging

http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/details/10876

Dr. Felipe Sierra is the Director of the Division of Aging Biology at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health. The Division of Aging Biology funds research into the basic biochemical, genetic, and physiological mechanisms underlying the process of aging and age-related changes in humans. Dr. Sierra received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Florida and completed his post-doctoral training at the University of Geneva. Before joining the National Institute on Aging, Dr. Sierra was an Associate Professor at Medical College of Pennsylvania and at the School of Medicine, University of Chile, where his research focused on changes in gene expression during aging.

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Arthur Stone

State University of New York at Stony Brook

http://www.stonybrookmedicalcenter.org/psychiatry/stone_a

Arthur Stone is Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology and Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at SUNY Stony Brook. His research interests include self-report of medical and psychological outcomes, ecological momentary assessment, stress and coping, psychoendocrinology, and behavioral medicine. He has served as editor or associate editor of Health Psychology, Annals of Behavioral Medicine, and Psychology and Health.

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Stephen Suomi

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

https://www.nichd.nih.gov/about/staff/Pages/bio.aspx?nih_id=0010152932

Stephen J. Suomi, Ph.D. is Chief of the Laboratory of Comparative Ethology at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. He also holds research professorships at the University of Virginia, the University of Maryland, College Park, the Johns Hopkins University, Georgetown University, the Pennsylvania State University, and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Suomi earned his B.A. in psychology at Stanford University in 1968, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1969 and 1971, respectively. He then joined the Psychology faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he eventually attained the rank of Professor before moving to the NICHD in 1983. (Read more at the above link)

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Richard Suzman

National Institute on Aging

http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/dbsr/richard-suzman-phd

Dr. Richard Suzman is the Director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Research at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health. The Division of Behavioral and Social Research is one of four extramural research programs at the NIA, and is one of the largest funders of social science research in the country. He has served previously as Chief of Demography and Population Epidemiology at NIA, where he developed and directed the program that funds research and training in demography, epidemiology, and the economics of aging. He was also Director of the Office of the Demography of Aging, the focal point for demographic statistics and research within NIA and across other Federal and international agencies. (Read more at the above link)

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Linda Waite

University of Chicago

http://sociology.uchicago.edu/people/faculty/waite.shtml

Linda Waite is the Lucy Flower Professor in Urban Sociology at the University of Chicago. Waite's current research interests include social demography, aging, the family, health, working families, the link between biology, psychology and the social world. Waite's current research focus on the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), a study which has at its core a national survey of older adults first interviewed in 2005 and 2006. A second interview is planned for NSHAP respondents and their partners in 2010.

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David Weir

University of Michigan

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/people/profile/568/David_Weir

David Weir is a Research Affiliate in the Population Studies Center and Research Professor in the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan. Dr. Weir's current research interests include the measurement of health-related quality of life; the use of cost-effectiveness measures in health policy and medical decision-making; the role of supplemental health insurance in the Medicare population; the effects of health, gender, and marital status on economic well-being in retirement; and the effects of early-life experience on longevity and health at older ages. He also directs the Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

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