Bios of 2017 RSI and Mini-Med School Participants

Additional participants and their bios will be added as their information is confirmed.

John T. Cacioppo

The University of Chicago

https://psychology.uchicago.edu/directory/john-t-cacioppo

John Cacioppo is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake Distinguished Service Professor of Psychology, Director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience, Chair of the Social Psychology Graduate Program, and a member of the Grossman Institute for Neuroscience, Quantitative Biology and Human Behavior. His research focuses on perceived social isolation (e.g., what is termed loneliness in humans) and the social brain. Cacioppo currently serves as a Member of the President's Committee on the National Medal of Science, and has served as Chair of the Board of Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences at the National Research Council; Member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate; and Member of the National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review (CSR) Advisory Council, among many others. He has been elected to Fellow status in 18 scientific societies, is the author of more than 500 articles and books, and his awards include the Troland Award (National Academy of Sciences, 1989); Campbell Award (2000); Theoretical Innovation Prize (2008) and Award for Distinguished Service (2008) from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, among numerous others.

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Ana Maria Cuervo

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

http://www.einstein.yu.edu/faculty/8784/ana-maria-cuervo/

Dr. Cuervo is co-director of the Einstein Institute for Aging Research, and a member of the Einstein Liver Research Center and Cancer Center. In 2001 she started her laboratory at Einstein, where she studies the role of protein-degradation in aging and age-related disorders, with emphasis in neurodegeneration and metabolic disorders.

Dr. Cuervo's group is interested in understanding how altered proteins can be eliminated from the cells and their components recycled. Her group has linked alterations in lysosomal protein degradation (autophagy) with different neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. They have also proven that restoration of normal lysosomal function prevents accumulation of damaged proteins with age, demonstrating this way that removal of these toxic products is possible.Dr. Cuervo is considered a leader in the field of protein degradation in relation to biology of aging and has presented her work in numerous national and international institutions, including the Robert R. Konh Memorial Lecture, the NIH Director's Lecture, the Roy Walford Endowed Lecture, the Cherkin Award lecture on Gerontology, the Feodor Lynen Lecture and the Margaret Pitman Lecture. She has organized and chaired international conferences on protein degradation and on aging, belongs to the editorial board of scientific journals in this topic, and is currently co-editor-in-chief of Aging Cell and associate editor of Autophagy.

Dr. Cuervo has served in NIH advisory panels, special emphasis panels, and study sections, the NIA Scientific Council and has been recently elected member of the NIH Council of Councils. She has received the 2005 P. Benson Award in Cell Biology, the 2005/8 Keith Porter Fellow in Cell Biology, the 2006 Nathan Shock Memorial Lecture Award, the 2008 Vincent Cristofalo Rising Start in Aging Award, the 2010 Bennett J. Cohen Award in Aging Biology, the 2012 Marshall S. Horwitz, MD Faculty Prize for Research Excellence and the 2015 Saul Korey Prize in Translational Medicine Science.

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Steve Cole

University of California, Los Angeles

http://people.healthsciences.ucla.edu/institution/personnel?personnel_id=45359

Dr. Steve Cole is a Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences in the UCLA School of Medicine. His research uses computational bioinformatics to map the biological pathways by which social environments influence gene expression by viral, cancer, and immune cell genomes. Dr. Cole is a member of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the UCLA Molecular Biology Institute, director of the UCLA Social Genomics Core Laboratory and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Mark Duggan

Stanford University

http://web.stanford.edu/~mgduggan/about.html

Mark Duggan is The Trione Director of SIEPR and The Wayne and Jodi Cooperman Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering at M.I.T. in 1992 and 1994, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1999. He is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and serves on the Editorial Board of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy. Professor Duggan's research focuses on the health care sector and also on the effects of government expenditure programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid on the behavior of individuals and firms. Some of his more recent research is exploring the effect of federal disability programs on the labor market and of the Affordable Care Act on the labor market and health care costs.

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Kimberly Firth

NIH

https://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/srb/firth-kimberly

Kimberly Firth, Ph.D. is a Scientific Review Officer in the Scientific Review Branch of the National Institute on Aging (NIA). She holds a Master's Degree in Experimental Psychology from the University of Massachusetts and a dual Ph.D. in Social and Developmental Psychology from Brandeis University under the mentorship of Dr. Margie Lachman. Prior to coming to the NIA, Kimberly was the Director of Research for the Optimal Healing Environments Program at the Samueli Institute, a non-profit research foundation with the mission of transforming healthcare through the scientific exploration of holistic and complementary healing modalities. Subsequent to that, Dr. Firth was an Assistant Professor of Research Methods at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Her significant research experience has included work in the area of adult midlife development and aging, temporal orientation and life satisfaction, implicit bias, and the effects of cultural enrichment on the physical and mental health of older adults.

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Esther Friedman

RAND Corporation

http://www.rand.org/about/people/f/friedman_esther_m.html

Esther Friedman is a behavioral and social scientist at the RAND Corporation, professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, and Director, RAND Mini-Medical School for Social Scientists. Her research is motivated by an interest in how disparities in health, wealth, and aging come about. She is particularly interested in the role of family — both childhood family environments and later life family characteristics and relationships — in shaping trajectories of healthy aging. Friedman earned a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Prior to entering the Ph.D. program, she obtained a master's degree in statistics from Columbia University and worked as a statistician at Mathematica Policy Research and as a biostatistician at the Emory University Center on Health Outcomes and Quality. Most recently, she was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at Harvard University.

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Melissa Gerald

National Institute on Aging

https://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/dbsr/gerald-melissa

Melissa Gerald is a program director at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the Division of Behavioral and Social Research (BSR) at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). Gerald's portfolio is focused on the role and impact of families and interpersonal relationships on health and well-being in midlife and older age, and she is developing a research program devoted to animal models of human sociality. She also manages aging-relevant research on sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations and on characterizing and reducing stigma to improve health, and she represents NIA on the trans-NIH SGM Research Coordinating Committee. Dr. Gerald obtained her Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles and her bachelor's degree in Anthropology and Psychology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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David Grabowski

Harvard Medical School

https://www.hcp.med.harvard.edu/faculty/core/david-grabowski-phd

David C. Grabowski, is a professor of health care policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. His research focuses on the economics of aging with a particular interest in the area of long-term care.

He was the principal investigator on grants from the NIA examining Medicare payment incentives and the implications for nursing home volume, patient acuity and quality of care; selection and the impact of ownership on nursing home quality; public policy and the demand for long-term care insurance; and specialization in the treatment of serious mental illness or dementia.

He is a coeditor of the journal Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology and he is a member of the editorial board of Medical Care Research & Review and B.E. Journals in Economic Analysis & Policy. He was the 2004 recipient of the Thompson Prize for Young Investigators from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. Dr. Grabowski received his PhD in public policy from the Irving B. Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago.

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John Haaga

National Institute on Aging

http://www.nia.nih.gov/about/staff/dbsr/john-haaga-phd

John Haaga has served since May 2016 as Director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Research in the National Institute on Aging. From 2004 to 2015 he was Deputy Director, and from April 2015 Acting Director, of the division. He leads NIA's extramural program funding research in economics, demography, epidemiology, cognitive science and social neurosciences, behavioral genetics, and health services research related to aging. This program includes major data collection and dissemination in the United States and cross-national comparative research on global health and aging. Dr. Haaga also serves as coordinator for the trans-NIH Common Fund Program in Health Economics. Dr. Haaga has served as president of the Association of Population Centers and secretary-treasurer and elected member of the Board of Directors (2012-2014) for the Population Association of America. He received his Ph.D. in public policy from the Pardee RAND Graduate School, and he has a B.A. in modern history from Oxford University and an M.A. in international relations from John Hopkins University.

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Pamela Herd

University of Wisconsin, Madison

https://www.lafollette.wisc.edu/faculty-staff/faculty/pamela-herd

Pamela Herd is Professor of Public Affairs and Sociology. Broadly, her work focuses on aging, policy, health, and inequality. She has two streams of research. One stream examines how social policies (i.e., Social Security) affect gender, race, and class inequalities. The second stream focuses on the relationship between social factors and health. She is the Principal Investigator of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a member of the Board of Overseers of the General Social Survey, a member of the Board of Overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. Herd co-authored the 2007 book Market Friendly or Family Friendly? The State and Gender Inequality in Old Age with Madonna Harrington Meyer. The book is part of the American Sociological Association's Rose Series on Public Policy and was the winner of the Gerontological Society of America Section on Behavioral and Social Sciences Kalish Publication Award.

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Kenneth Kosik

University of California, Santa Barbara

https://www.mcdb.ucsb.edu/people/faculty/kosik

Kenneth S. Kosik completed a B.A. and M.A. in English literature from Case Western Reserve University in 1972 and an M.D. from the Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1976. He served as a resident in neurology at Tufts New England Medical Center and was Chief Resident in 1980. Beginning in 1980 he held a series of academic appointments at the Harvard Medical School and achieved the rank of full professor in 1996. In 2004, Kosik became the Harriman Professor of Neuroscience Research and Co-Director of the Neuroscience Research Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The Kosik lab approach is largely reductionist with an emphasis on genes, molecules and cells, and studies in the lab also encompass systems level informatic approaches that include large genomic and transcriptional and imaging data sets. One theme in the lab is how cells acquire and lose their identities. The lab is also interested in the underlying molecular basis of plasticity, particularly how protein translation at the synapse affects learning and how impairments of plasticity lead to neurodegenerative diseases.

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Jinkook Lee

University of Southern California and RAND

http://static.usc.edu/people/staff/jinkookl

Jinkook Lee is the Director of Program on Global Aging, Health, and Policy (p2aging.org) at University of Southern California and an adjunct senior economist at the RAND Corporation. She obtained her Ph.D. at the Ohio State University and previously held faculty positions at the Ohio State University and the University of Georgia. Her research agenda focuses on economics of aging, which has become increasingly interdisciplinary in recent years. She has co-led the development of two multidisciplinary, longitudinal population surveys, the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI), and currently serves as a co-PI of LASI. She also leads an international data harmonization project funded by the National Institute on Aging, the Gateway to Global Aging Data (g2aging.org), a platform for population survey data on aging from 31 countries around the world. Her current research interests include late-life cognition and dementia, the determinants of late-life health and subjective well-being, and policy effects on health and wellbeing of elderly in East Asia.

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Robert Levenson

University of California, Berkeley

http://psychology.berkeley.edu/people/robert-w-levenson

Robert W. Levenson works in the areas of human psychophysiology and affective neuroscience, both of which involve studying the interplay between psychological and physiological processes. Much of his work focuses on the nature of human emotion, in terms of its physiological manifestations, variations in emotion associated with age, gender, culture, and pathology, and the role emotion plays in interpersonal interactions. Dr. Levenson's research group is currently focusing primarily on two major projects: a study of emotion and normal aging and a study of the impact of neurodegenerative diseases on emotional functioning, both supported by grants from the National Institute of Aging.

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Gordon Lithgow

The Buck Institute for Research on Aging

http://www.buckinstitute.org/lithgowLab

Dr. Lithgow sheds light on the mechanisms of aging by identifying agents that extend lifespan or prevent age-related disease. He has discovered a range of factors that can lengthen life in the microscopic worm Caenorhabditis elegans, and he applies these findings to studies in human cell cultures. The Lithgow lab has discovered that certain cell proteins capable of extending life can also be closely involved in disease prevention. But when proteins play such dual roles, they may sometimes make tradeoffs that affect the fate of the organism. Dr. Lithgow is studying genetic variations in "checkpoint proteins" that may create a trade-off between the rate of aging and incidence of cancer.

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Kathleen McGarry

University of California, Los Angeles

http://economics.ucla.edu/person/kathleen-mcgarry/

Kathleen McGarry is a professor of economics at the University of California, Los Angeles and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Dr. McGarry's research focuses on the well being of the elderly with particular attention paid to public and private transfers, including the Medicare and Supplemental Security Income programs and the transfer of resources within families. Her research combines work on the financial aspects of aging with issues related to health economics to examine insurance coverage among the elderly. She has studied long-term care, health, and life insurance markets, as well as the role played by families in providing insurance for their least well-off members. McGarry's current work analyzes the importance of end of life medical expenses, particularly expenses associated with nursing homes and home health care, and differences in spending by disability status.

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Nicole Maestas

Harvard University and RAND Corporation

http://www.hcp.med.harvard.edu/faculty/core/nicole-maestas-phd

Nicole Maestas, Ph.D. is an associate professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School. Her research studies how the health and disability insurance systems affect individual economic behaviors, such as labor supply and the consumption of medical care.

Dr. Maestas' research in disability economics has shown how the federal disability insurance system discourages employment by people with disabilities; her work on the effects of health insurance coverage showed that the onset of Medicare eligibility causes a sharp increase in the use of health care services; and her research on the economics of aging has demonstrated significant shifts in labor supply patterns at older ages. Dr. Maestas has testified before Congress about her research on two occasions, once before the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee and once before the Senate Finance Committee. She recently completed service on a national disability policy panel convened by the Social Security Advisory Board.

Dr. Maestas graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Wellesley College. She received her M.P.P. in Public Policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, and her Ph.D. in Economics also from UC Berkeley.

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Carol Mangione

University of California, Los Angeles

http://people.healthsciences.ucla.edu/institution/personnel

Carol M. Mangione, M.D., M.S.P.H., is the Barbara A. Levey MD & Gerald S. Levey M.D. Endowed Chair and Professor of Medicine and Health Services at UCLA. Dr. Mangione is the director of the NIH/NIA funded UCLA/Drew Resource Center for Minority Aging Research/Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR III/CHIME II), and codirector of the UCLA Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. In both of these programs she mentors and trains physicians developing research careers.

Dr. Mangione is the principal investigator for the Translational Research Centers for Diabetes Within Managed-Care Settings (TRIAD) Legacy study, funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to study the quality of care for persons with diabetes where her work has focused on the relationship between organization of care, cost sharing, control of cardiovascular risk factors and process outcomes such as adherence to medications. Dr. Mangione is also principal investigator of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Virtual Lab for California Project. The purpose of this project is to create a coalition of government, academic, and private entities within the state of California to provide access to a diverse set of existing data to answer research questions relating to the health of women and minorities across the life span. In addition Dr. Mangione is co-principal investigator of the new NIH/NIA funded UCLA-Drew/City of Los Angeles Area Agency on Aging Center for Community Research. The major goal of this project is to create a permanent community research infrastructure to create sustained meaningful improvement in the quality of life of lower income older adults.

Dr. Mangione is also a co-investigator of the California Healthcare Foundation (CHCF) funded project entitled, Acting to Reduce Variation in Utilization: Developing Interventions. This project is the second phase of an effort in further understanding variation in resource utilization among six academic medical centers and to identify and implement interventions to reduce unwarranted variation. Currently, Dr. Mangione serves as co-investigator of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute funded project entitled, Comparative Effectiveness and Outcomes Improvement (CEOI). This project is a statewide effort that aims to develop sustainable statewide infrastructure for Comparative Effectiveness Research on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease among managed care populations. Funded by the NIH/NIA, in addition Dr. Mangione currently is a co-investigator on a study entitled, Evaluating an Emergency Department Observation Syncope Protocol for Older Adults. The goal of this study is to evaluate an Emergency Department Syncope Observation Protocol (EDOSP) in the management of older patients with syncope.

Dr. Mangione received her B.S. from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, her M.D. degree from the University of California, San Francisco, and her M.S.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston. She is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and Association of American Physicians (ASCI/AAP) and recipient of the 2007 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) Mid-Career Mentorship Award. She is also currently a member of the Board of Governors for the Pardee RAND Graduate School.

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Kathleen Mullen

RAND Corporation

https://preview.rand.org/about/people/m/mullen_kathleen.html

Kathleen Mullen is a senior economist at the RAND Corporation and director of the RAND Center for Disability Research; she is also an associate director of the Economics, Sociology and Statistics Department and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Her work addresses the economics of retirement, health, and disability, with an emphasis on the incentive effects of social insurance programs such as Social Security and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). In her research, Mullen has employed a variety of research designs applying both reduced form and structural econometric methods. She has pursued research on, among other things, the effects of SSDI receipt on labor supply; the effects of long waiting times on the subsequent labor force participation and earnings of rejected SSDI applicants; how changes in eligibility requirements affect SSDI or Social Security claiming; and the effects of changes in Social Security or disability insurance incentives in other countries on labor supply for workers at older ages, and what those findings suggest about potential evaluations of reforms in the United States. Mullen received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

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Philip Pantoja

RAND Corporation

https://www.rand.org/pubs/authors/p/pantoja_philip.html

Mr. Pantoja has worked as a data analyst in many different types of settings, and with a diverse group of professionals, including social workers, research psychologists, medical doctors, and economists. His current work at the RAND Corporation is through the Center for the Study of Aging, where he works on creating some of the core RAND HRS data products, including the RAND HRS Data File, and the RAND Income and Wealth Imputation File. Previously, Mr. Pantoja worked as a Health Statistician at the Department of Veterans Affairs, where he led all data management and analysis tasks tor a wide range of projects, addressing issues such as the quality of care for advanced stage cancer patients, health care delivery for women veterans, and gender differences in performance. Mr. Pantoja has experience using such software packages as SAS, SUDAAN, and STATA.

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Georgeanne Patmios

NIH

Georgeanne Patmios is currently the Acting Chief of the Population and Social Processes Branch of the Division of Behavioral and Social Research at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health (NIH). Ms. Patmios has worked at NIA since 1993, including a posting at the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research. She manages research portfolios primarily in demography, sociology, social epidemiology, and economics, in addition to several BSR-wide initiatives, including training and the NIA Centers on Demography and Economics of Aging. She is the NIA Program Official for the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) cooperative agreement grants. Ms. Patmios received an M.A. in health policy/health services administration from George Washington University and B.A. in Economics from Wellesley College.

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James P. Smith

RAND Corporation

https://www.rand.org/about/people/s/smith_james_p.html

James P. Smith holds the Distinguished Chair in Labor Markets and Demographic Studies at the RAND Corporation. He has studied immigration, the economics of aging, black-white wages and employment, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, the interrelation of health and economic status, and the effects of attrition and nonresponse in the National Institute on Aging's Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

Smith chaired the Panel on Demographic and Economic Impacts of Immigration (1995–1997), the Committee on Population, and the Committee on National Statistics, National Academy of Sciences. He has been an invited speaker before the President's Initiative on Race in Phoenix, the Federal Reserve Board of Los Angeles, and the Prime Minister and members of Parliament of New Zealand, among many others. Smith has twice received the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Merit Award, the most distinguished honor NIH grants to a researcher. In 2013, Smith received an honorary degree of Doctor of the University from the University of Stirling, Scotland; in 2011, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine; and in 2009, he received the Ulysses Medal from University College Dublin. Smith received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

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David Walker

University of California, Los Angeles

https://www.ibp.ucla.edu/physcifacultyindiv.php?FacultyKey=9698

Dr. Walker is an Associate Professor at UCLA's Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology whose primary research goal is to better understand the basic biology of the aging process. Knowing that the mechanisms which cause the deterioration of cellular functions during the aging process remain poorly understood, Dr. Walker's lab is using the powerful genetics of the fruit fly Drosophila to better understand the molecular biology of aging. The lab seeks to identify genes and cellular pathways that modulate the rate of aging by using a combination of molecular genetic and biochemical tools. The long-term aim of this research is to provide novel therapeutic targets to counteract age-related human diseases.

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Jenny Wilkens

University of Southern California

Jenny Wilkens is a Research Programmer for the Program on Global Aging, Health, and Policy at the USC Center for Economic and Social Research. Her academic background constitutes a BA in economics and a MPH with an emphasis in epidemiology. Additionally, she has practical experience with genetics and statistical programming. She primarily works on data harmonization for the international family of HRS sister studies, as well as working to further develop and to maintain the Gateway to Global Aging Data.

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