Center for Asia Pacific Policy

The RAND Center for Asia Pacific Policy (CAPP) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, multidisciplinary research center within RAND. CAPP’s mission is to improve policy by providing decision-makers and the public with rigorous, objective, cutting-edge research on critical policy challenges facing Asia and U.S.-Asia relations.

CAPP Publications of Note

  • How Can China Reduce Its Air Pollution, and How Much Will It Cost?

    Jan 12, 2015

    Air pollution has been one of the most harmful consequences of China's last three decades of economic transformation and growth. China must address its air-pollution problem soon, but approaches to improve air quality come at a cost.

  • The U.S.-Japan Alliance Conference Series

    Dec 5, 2014

    The U.S.-Japan alliance is the cornerstone of the U.S. presence in Asia. A series of three discussions with RAND experts and guest speakers (Nov. 6, Nov. 7, and Dec. 5) will explore new issues that have arisen for the alliance as a result of rapid, dramatic changes in the security, economic, and technological environments of Northeast Asia.

  • RAND Experts Discuss Chinese Engagement in Africa

    Oct 14, 2014

    Larry Hanauer and Lyle Morris discussed their recent report, Chinese Engagement in Africa, as part of RAND's China Luncheon Series. They took a comprehensive look at Chinese and African objectives in the political and economic spheres and the means by which they work to achieve their goals.

  • Big Trouble in Little China

    Sep 9, 2014

    As China's central government and Hong Kong residents consider next steps after last week's decision on the 2017 chief executive election, they will do so against a background of deteriorating trust, declining social acceptance of integration, and a worsening of relations between Hong Kong and mainland Chinese society.

  • A U.S. Strategy for Dealing with China

    Sep 3, 2014

    Developing a next generation strategy for dealing with China will require the United States to sculpt a balanced and flexible approach that protects U.S. interest in East Asia while at the same time fosters cooperation with China on issues of common concern.

  • A Liberated Yuan Is Likely to Fall

    May 21, 2014

    Some critics claim that the People's Bank of China is contriving to weaken the yuan's value to promote Chinese exports and stimulate the country's lagging growth. But the yuan's true value may be lower than some popular estimates.