Welcome to the Homeland Security and Defense Center

The Homeland Security and Defense Center conducts analysis to prepare and protect communities and critical infrastructure from natural disasters and terrorism. Center projects examine a wide range of risk management problems including coastal and border security, emergency preparedness and response, defense support to civil authorities, transportation security, domestic intelligence programs, technology acquisition, and related topics.

Center clients include the Department of Homeland Security, Department of Defense, the Department of Justice, and other organizations charged with security and disaster preparedness, response and recovery.

The Homeland Security and Defense Center is a joint center of the RAND National Security Research Division and RAND Justice, Infrastructure, and Environment.

Recent Publications and Blog Posts

  • An Enduring Need for Better Measures of Emergency Preparedness

    Jun 25, 2014

    In an era of fiscal austerity, the need for measurement and assessment becomes manifold. Tied to good government goals and responsible stewardship of public funds, measurements are also necessary to educate the public about what it should—and should not—reasonably expect when disaster strikes.

  • Securing America's Ports by Better Measuring Capabilities

    Jun 13, 2014

    Funding for improving U.S. port security has declined from $389 million in 2008 to $100 million in 2014. This makes it more important than ever to ensure the highest possible return on investment from grant funding.

  • Securing America's Ports

    Jun 4, 2014

    America's ports could be made more secure by improving the evaluation of port security programs; increasing the reliance on local risk assessments when awarding port security grants; and reconsidering the 100 percent container inspection mandate.

  • Improving DHS Accountability for Acquisitions

    Apr 22, 2014

    As the House of Representatives considers legislation that would reform the Department of Homeland Security's acquisitions process, an important issues come to the forefront—the need for accountability in the acquisitions process.

  • Expiration of Terrorism Risk Insurance Act Could Hurt National Security

    Mar 6, 2014

    The current terrorism risk insurance act will expire in 2014 and Congress again is considering the appropriate government role in terrorism insurance markets. If the act expires and the take-up rate for terrorism insurance falls, then the U.S. would be less resilient to future terrorist attacks.