Stanton Nuclear Security Fellows Program

Overview | Eligibility | Applications | Selection | About the Stanton Foundation | Fellows

The deadline for 2014 applications has passed. The application period for 2015 fellows will open in October 2014.

Overview

The purpose of the Stanton Nuclear Security Fellows Program is to stimulate the development of the next generation of thought leaders on nuclear security related topics by supporting interdisciplinary research that will advance policy-relevant understanding of the issues.

Fellows will carry out a year-long period of independent research but will also be expected to be associated with RAND client-sponsored research (up to one day per week). Within their RAND tenure, fellows are expected to produce policy-relevant studies that contribute to the general body of knowledge on nuclear security. The written product will be considered for publication by RAND.

Each fellowship will extend for a full year beginning in September of each year. Fellows will be located at one of RAND's three U.S. locations for the duration of their fellowship (Santa Monica, CA; Washington, DC; or Pittsburgh, PA). Additionally, each fellow will receive a stipend: doctoral students will receive a $50,000 stipend, post-doctoral students will receive a $75,000 stipend, and junior faculty members will receive a $100,000 stipend.

Eligibility

Candidates for the program will be post-doctoral students or junior faculty members. Doctoral students may be considered if their dissertation topic is in the field of nuclear security. Prior experience will be defined broadly to include disciplines such as nuclear policy, security, engineering, physics, and related fields.

Applications

Applicants should submit a completed application form, curriculum vitae, two letters of recommendation, a personal statement, and a project proposal. In addition, each applicant may be requested to provide official undergraduate and graduate school transcripts from all institutions attended since completing high school.

Application forms are available online (in PDF or in interactive format).
Recommendation forms are available online in PDF format.

Selection

Up to three (3) Fellowships will be awarded each year. Fellows will be selected by a committee composed of RAND faculty and distinguished outside experts in the field of nuclear security. Selections will be made by April.

For additional information, please contact:

Ms. Sarah Harting
RAND
1200 South Hayes Street
Arlington, VA 22202
United States of America

Email: Sarah_Harting@rand.org

Telephone: (703) 413-1100, ext. 5675

About the Stanton Foundation

The Stanton Foundation was created by Frank Stanton, former president of CBS, who is widely regarded as one of the greatest executives in the history of electronic communications. In 1954, Dwight Eisenhower appointed him to a committee convened to develop the first comprehensive plan for the survival of the U.S. following a nuclear attack. Stanton had lead responsibility for developing plans for national and international communication in the aftermath of a nuclear incident. Stanton also served as the chairman (1961-67) and trustee (1957-78) of the RAND Corporation. The Stanton Foundation aims, through its support of the Nuclear Security Fellows program, to perpetuate his efforts to meet these challenges.

Stanton Fellows

2014–2015

Jonathan Hunt, Ph.D. in history, University of Texas at Austin; B.A. in Plan II honors program, and history, and Russian, East European and Eurasian studies, University of Texas at Austin.

Caroline Milne, Ph.D. candidate in public affairs with concentration in security studies, Princeton University; M.A. in public affairs, Princeton University; M.A. with merit in science and security, King's College London; B.S. in aerospace engineering with concentration in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Sameer Lalwani, Ph.D. in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; B.A. in political science, University of California, Berkeley.

2013–2014

Christopher Clary, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. in national security affairs, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; B.A. in international studies and history, Wichita State University.

Edward Geist, Ph.D. in history, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A. in history, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; B.A. in history, College of William and Mary.

Rebecca Gibbons, Ph.D. candidate in international relations, Georgetown University; M.A. in international security, Georgetown University; B.A. in psychological and brain sciences, Dartmouth College.

2012–2013

Anthony Barrett, Ph.D. in engineering and public policy, Carnegie Mellon University; B.S. in chemical engineering, University of California, San Diego.

Jeffrey Kaplow, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, San Diego; M.A. in political science, University of California, San Diego; M.P.P. in international security, Harvard Kennedy School; B.A. in political science, Yale University.

Jaganath Sankaran, Ph.D. in public policy, University of Maryland; M.A. in engineering and public policy, University of Maryland; B.S. in technology (mechanical engineering), Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, India.

2011–2012

Lance Kim, Ph.D. in nuclear engineering, University of California, Berkeley; M.P.P and M.S. in public policy and nuclear engineering, University of California, Berkeley; B.S. in nuclear and mechanical engineering, University of California, Berkeley.

Dane Swango, Ph.D. in political science, University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. in political science, University of California, Los Angeles; B.S. in economics and physics, Duke University.

2010–2011

David Kearn, Ph.D. in foreign affairs, University of Virginia; M.P.P. in international security, Harvard Kennedy School; B.A. in political science, Amherst College.

Robert Reardon, Ph.D. in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S. in biology, University of Illinois at Chicago; A.B. in history, Columbia College.

Markus Schiller, Ph.D. in astronautics, Technical University Munich, a Diplom-Ingenieur Luft- u. Raumfahrt (equivalent to a M.S. in aerospace engineering), Technical University Munich; B.S. equivalent in mechanical engineering, Technical University Munich.