Reading for Understanding

Toward an R&D Program in Reading Comprehension

by Catherine Snow

View related products

Download

Download eBook for Free

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.8 MB Best for desktop computers.

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 7.0 or higher for the best experience.

ePub file 2.1 MB Best for mobile devices.

On desktop computers and some mobile devices, you may need to download an eBook reader to view ePub files. Calibre is an example of a free and open source e-book library management application.

mobi file 0.4 MB Best for Kindle 1-3.

On desktop computers and some mobile devices, you may need to download an eBook reader to view mobi files. Amazon Kindle is the most popular reader for mobi files.

Download Individual Chapters Below

Note: Many electronic documents posted prior to 2003 are available as chapter PDFs or HTML files linked from the Contents.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 FormatList Price Price
Add to Cart Paperback184 pages $20.00 $16.00 20% Web Discount

Abstract

In fall 1999, the Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) asked RAND to examine how OERI might improve the quality and relevance of the education research it funds. The RAND Reading Study Group (RRSG) was charged with developing a research framework to address the most pressing issues in literacy. RRSG focused on reading comprehension wherein the highest priorities for research are: (1) Instruction: How can we best promote the development of proficient reading and prevent reading comprehension difficulties? (2) Teacher preparation and professional development: How can we prepare teachers to deliver effective comprehension instruction? (3) Assessment: How can we develop an assessment system for reading comprehension that includes the design of valid and reliable measures of self-regulated, strategic reading that are sensitive to instructional interventions? RRSG concluded that the research infrastructure must: (a) obtain long-term funding that is sustained across administrations and political constituencies; (b) acquire intellectual leadership that endures over a substantial time frame and is insulated from political forces; (c) synthesize knowledge across the various research initiatives in systematic ways; (d) enlist a cadre of well-trained investigators; and, (e) fund research that is rigorous and of high quality.

Table of Contents

  • Preface PDF

  • Figures PDF

  • Tables PDF

  • Summary

    Executive Summary PDF

  • Acknowledgements

    Acknowledgments PDF

  • RAND Reading Study Group and RAND Staff PDF

  • Chapter 1

    Introduction PDF

  • Chapter 2

    Defining Comprehension PDF

  • Chapter 3

    Variability in Reading Comprehension PDF

  • Chapter 4

    A Research Agenda for Improving Reading Comprehension PDF

  • Chapter 5

    Strategies for Developing a Research Program on Reading Comprehension PDF

  • Afterword PDF

  • Appendix A

    An Expanded Review of the Research on Variability in Reading Comprehension PDF

  • Appendix B

    Outline of a Sample Request for Application PDF

  • References PDF

  • Authors

    Biographical Sketches PDF

This research was conducted within RAND Science and Technology and RAND Education.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation monograph report series. The monograph/report was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1993 to 2003. RAND monograph/reports presented major research findings that addressed the challenges facing the public and private sectors. They included executive summaries, technical documentation, and synthesis pieces.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.