Joie Acosta

Photo of Joie Acosta
Behavioral Scientist; Affiliated Faculty, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Washington Office

Education

Ph.D. in community and cultural psychology, University of Hawai'i

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

More Experts

Overview

Joie Acosta is a behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation and on the faculty of the Pardee RAND Graduate School. She provides managerial, research, evaluation, and technical expertise on projects related to public health; preventing violence and substance abuse; emergency preparedness and response; and systems change. Her recent RAND publications include Building Community Resilience to Disasters: A Way Forward to Enhance National Health Security (Chandra et al., 2011); Source Materials for the Healthy Communities Toolkit: A Resource Guide for Community and Faith-Based Organizations (Acosta et al., 2011); and Patient Incentives to Motivate Doctor Visits and Reduce Hypertension Disparities (Martin et al., 2011). Acosta received her Ph.D. in community and cultural psychology at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa.

Recent Projects

  • Building community resilience to disasters
  • Preventing suicide in the U.S. military
  • Behavioral health in the District of Columbia: assessing need and evaluating the public system of care
  • The role of community and faith-based organizations in improving community well-being

Recent Media Appearances

Commentary: Montgomery Advertiser

Commentary

  • Fotolia_29494778_Subscription_Monthly_XXL

    U.S. Needs to Improve Community-Based Drug, Alcohol Prevention

    As familiar as Americans are with the problems of youth drug and alcohol abuse, we are not identifying all the potential solutions. While observers criticize overemphasis in U.S. policy on enforcement and scant resources devoted to treatment, the focus on these approaches often ignores a key piece of the puzzle: prevention.

    Jan 31, 2014 | The Orange County Register

  • Oklahoma tornado cleanup

    Translating Policy Into Action to Build Community Resilience

    The philosophy and motivation surrounding community resilience has strongly resonated with community leaders but there remains a divide between how experts articulate resilience policy and how that policy translates to on-the-ground implementation. Building Community Resilience: An Online Training addresses that tension.

    Sep 4, 2013 | The RAND Blog

  • teens making a toast with shots

    Getting To Outcomes: Improvement of Prevention Capacity Unveiled at a Summit of Maine Officials and Stakeholders

    Community-based practitioners can improve their programs using Getting To Outcomes®, a toolkit, training, and onsite-support package which enhances their ability to prevent drug and alcohol use among youth.

    Apr 29, 2013

  • a group sitting outside with a teacher leading discussion

    'Implementation Science' May Help Providers Adopt New Treatments Despite Real-World Constraints

    A new field called implementation science addresses the issue of how to best support providers to take up new, research-proven treatments and implement them well. A RAND study will test how well Boys & Girls Clubs carry out a program proven to prevent teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, with and without an intervention called Getting To Outcomes.

    Feb 18, 2013

  • 61434

    'New Normal' Requires New Ways to Support Social and 'Human' Recovery

    Recent global disasters vividly illustrate that recovery entails more than simply restoring physical infrastructure such as roads and buildings; it is also a long process of restoring the social infrastructure—the daily routines and networks that support the physical and mental health and well-being of the population, write Anita Chandra and Joie Acosta.

    Nov 26, 2012 | RAND.org

  • girl_hurricane_supplies

    Why Aren't Americans Listening to Disaster Preparedness Messages?

    Given the recent spate of highly publicized disasters, why don't more Americans pay attention to the advice of public health officials? The messages they are getting are largely based on unverified assumptions, not hard evidence. Equally concerning, these assumptions may inadvertently hinder preparedness.

    Jun 29, 2012 | RAND.org

  • Human Side of Katrina Recovery Still Needs Work

    Four years after Hurricane Katrina, many people in the Gulf Coast region are still "just surviving," write Anita Chandra and Joie Acosta.

    Oct 17, 2009 | Montgomery Advertiser

Publications