Michael S. Chase

Photo of Michael Chase
Senior Political Scientist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Washington Office

Education

B.A. in political science, Brandeis University; M.A. in China studies, Johns Hopkins University SAIS; Ph.D. in international relations, Johns Hopkins University SAIS

Overview

Michael S. Chase is a senior political scientist at RAND, a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, and an adjunct professor in the China Studies and Strategic Studies Departments at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C.

A specialist in China and Asia-Pacific security issues, he was previously an associate professor at the U.S. Naval War College (NWC) in Newport, Rhode Island, where he served as director of the strategic deterrence group in the Warfare Analysis and Research Department and taught in the Strategy and Policy Department. Prior to joining the faculty at NWC, he was a research analyst at Defense Group Inc. and an associate international policy analyst at RAND. He is the author of the book Taiwan's Security Policy and numerous chapters and articles on China and Asia-Pacific security issues. His work has appeared in journals such as Asia Policy, Asian Security, China Brief, Survival, and the Journal of Strategic Studies.

His current research focuses on Chinese military modernization, China's nuclear policy and strategy and nuclear force modernization, Taiwan's defense policy, and Asia-Pacific security issues. Chase holds a Ph.D. in international affairs and M.A. in China Studies from SAIS and a B.A. in politics from Brandeis University. In addition, he studied Chinese at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center in Nanjing, China.

Pardee RAND Graduate School Courses

Concurrent Non-RAND Positions

Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

Commentary

  • People's Liberation Army soldiers take part in a search and rescue exercise near Qilian Yu subgroup in the Paracel Islands, known in China as Xisha Islands, South China Sea, July 14, 2016

    China's Military Reorganization Aims to Tighten Party Control and Strengthen the PLA's Warfighting Capabilities

    Xi Jinping's reforms could result in a leaner, more combat-effective PLA that presents a more potent challenge to China's neighbors and to U.S. interests. But even successful reforms will not guarantee victory on the battlefield, and any hypothetical conflict involving the U.S. would carry tremendous risks.

    Sep 6, 2016 ChinaFile

  • China's President Xi Jinping reviews an honour guard during a welcoming ceremony for Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari (not pictured) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, April 12, 2016

    Xi's Purge of the Military Prepares the Chinese Army for Confrontation

    Xi Jinping is relying on an unprecedented anti-corruption campaign, echoing Mao Zedong's dictum that “the party commands the gun,” and implementing a sweeping reorganization of the PLA to ensure his personal dominance over the military and to strengthen its ability to deter or win future wars.

    Apr 21, 2016 Newsweek

  • A billboard of Chinese President Xi Jinping is seen behind soldiers of the People's Liberation Army at a military base in Beijing, August 22, 2015

    Xi in Command: Downsizing and Reorganizing the People's Liberation Army

    Chinese President Xi Jinping recently announced that China would reduce the number of troops in its army by 300,000. But that is only a first step in a more ambitious reform and reorganization plan.

    Sep 14, 2015 Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative, CSIS

  • Soldiers of China's People's Liberation Army march during a training session for a military parade, Beijing, September 1, 2015

    China's Military Modernization: Eric Heginbotham and Michael Chase in Conversation

    Two RAND experts discuss their recent assessments of Chinese military modernization and its implications for U.S. interests in Asia.

    Sep 13, 2015 The RAND Blog

  • Soldiers of China's People's Liberation Army stand in formation ahead of a military parade marking the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, Beijing, September 3, 2015

    China's Military Parade Highlights Its New Strategic Capabilities

    China's elaborate military parade to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II showcased some of the People's Liberation Army's newest high-tech weapons.

    Sep 3, 2015 U.S. News & World Report

  • Chinese dredging vessels are purportedly seen around Fiery Cross Reef in the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea May 21, 2015

    China's Airfield Construction at Fiery Cross Reef in Context: Catch-Up or Coercion?

    Even if China really sees itself as undertaking legitimate activities to protect its rightful interests, it is not surprising that its rival claimants, as well as the United States and other countries in the region, see Beijing's island building activities as efforts to improve China's abilities to bully its neighbors.

    Aug 11, 2015 Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative, CSIS

  • PLA soldiers march ahead of the opening session of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at Tiananmen Sqaure in Beijing, March 3, 2015

    China's Incomplete Military Transformation

    Although the People's Liberation Army has made impressive progress over the past 20 years, it still suffers from a number of potentially serious problems. Understanding its weaknesses — particularly what PLA officers themselves see as the most important shortcomings — is just as critical as studying its strengths.

    Mar 18, 2015 China Policy Institute Blog

  • Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shakes hands with China's President Xi Jinping during a welcoming ceremony of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum, in Beijing, November 11, 2014

    A Thaw in Asia

    Chinese President Xi Jinping's meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe this week raised hope for the near term that the leaders of both countries can ease tensions between Asia's two largest economies.

    Nov 16, 2014 U.S. News & World Report

  • U.S. and China flags

    Engagement and Assurance: Debating the U.S.-Chinese Relationship

    The risks of strategic rivalry with China deserve serious attention. But the best way to avoid the destabilizing effects of military competition is sustained U.S. engagement with China and the region -- precisely what U.S. policy has been seeking to achieve.

    Nov 6, 2014 The National Interest

Publications