Gregory S. Jones

Photo of Gregory Jones
Adjunct Senior Defense Policy Analyst; Faculty Member, Pardee RAND Graduate School
Santa Monica Office

Education

A.B. in biology, University of Chicago

Media Resources

This researcher is available for interviews.

To arrange an interview, contact the RAND Office of Media Relations at (310) 451-6913, or email media@rand.org.

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Overview

Gregory S. Jones is an adjunct senior defense policy analyst at the RAND Corporation and a member of the Pardee RAND Graduate School faculty. His research has focused on the potential for terrorists and hostile countries to acquire and use nuclear, chemical, biological, and radiological weapons, and the formulation of policies and actions to control and counter these weapons. His most recent work examined ways to improve counterterrorism preparedness for the city of Pittsburgh. He is author or coauthor of more than 60 reports and articles.

Recent Projects

  • Improving the effectiveness of the Proliferation Security Initiative

Selected Publications

Stephen J. Carroll et al., Distribution of Losses from Large Terrorist Attacks Under the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act, RAND Corporation (MG-427), 2001

Gregory S. Jones, From Testing to Deploying Nuclear Forces: The Hard Choices Facing India and Pakistan, RAND Corporation (IP-192), 2000

Brian G. Chow and Gregory S. Jones, Managing Wastes With and Without Plutonium Separation, RAND Corporation (P-8035), 1999

Recent Media Appearances

Interviews: Voice of America

Commentary

  • Brazilian Army soldiers take part in a simulation of decontamination of multiple victims during a training against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks ahead of the 2016 Rio Olympics, March 11, 2016

    ISIS and Dirty Bombs

    There has been growing concern that terrorists might use radiological sources to create a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). Calculations have shown that an attack would be unlikely to produce radioactive contamination sufficient to kill or even injure anyone, but there would be psychological and economic effects.

    Jun 3, 2016 The Cipher Brief

  • Questions After the First U.S. Bank Takeover by a Chinese State-Controlled Company

    In considering foreign application to acquire U.S. companies, the United States needs to consider both risks as well as benefits in both defense and economic dimensions, write Charles Wolf, Jr., Brian Chow, Gregory Jones, and Scott Harold.

    May 15, 2012 RAND.org and GlobalSecurity.org

Publications