Blog Posts

Experts from the RAND Military Caregivers Study periodically unpack big ideas from their extensive research on the RAND Blog.

  • Caring for Our Nation's Hidden Heroes?

    May 7, 2015

    Thanks to a growing list of more than 100 organizations that have pledged their commitment as members of the Elizabeth Dole Foundation's National Coalition for Military Caregivers, our nation is taking long overdue action to support both our wounded warriors and those who care for them.

  • From Combat to Caregiving: Q&A with Kayla Williams

    Mar 6, 2015

    Kayla Williams talks about being a female soldier and the spouse of a wounded warrior, why veterans aren't broken and caregivers aren't saints, and more.

  • Honoring America's Veterans Requires Helping Their Families, Too

    Nov 11, 2014

    This Veterans Day, the United States especially honors the millions of veterans living with service-related illnesses and injuries. But it's also important to recognize the sacrifices of those helping them to recover and thrive: America's 5.5 million military caregivers.

  • Parallel Caregiver Crises, Military and Civilian

    Jul 9, 2014

    Among American caregivers, there are two expanding populations: those caring for military servicemembers struggling with physical or emotional wounds of war and those looking after people with dementia. Both face incalculable financial stresses and threats to their own health as a result of their caregiving roles.

  • Ask Me Anything: Rajeev Ramchand on Military Caregivers

    Jun 24, 2014

    With military caregivers quickly becoming a topic of national discussion, RAND's Rajeev Ramchand hosted an "Ask Me Anything" session on Reddit last week, fielding a variety of questions about military caregivers and other issues concerning mental health and the U.S. military.

  • One Military Caregiver's Story

    May 23, 2014

    America shouldn't forget the sacrifices of those who care for the wounded. Rachel O'Hern tells the story of her life as a military caregiver, one of millions of spouses, family members, and friends who support service members and veterans with physical or emotional injuries or illnesses.

  • Finding a New Normal: A Military Caregiver's Perspective

    May 6, 2014

    The landscape for caregivers remains very difficult. Many still need additional training on how to best provide care for their loved ones, respite so they can care for themselves, and other forms of support.

  • Four Ways to Help Military Caregivers

    Apr 15, 2014

    As momentum continues to build, stakeholders across the board should keep in mind four broad recommendations for how to help military caregivers.

  • Military Caregivers Are Hidden Heroes

    Apr 2, 2014

    Right now there are 5.5 million wives, husbands, siblings, parents, children and friends devoted to the care of those injured fighting America's wars. Theirs is an all-consuming, emotionally draining task, one that has been driven for too long by loyalty and love, but little support.

  • A World Without America's Military Caregivers

    Mar 31, 2014

    A world without military caregivers would be a harsher one for all, particularly for those who have served. Caregivers' sacrifices improve the lives of wounded, ill, and injured service members and veterans, more of whom would suffer without them.

  • Spotlight on America's Hidden Heroes: Military Caregivers

    Mar 24, 2014

    Despite military caregivers' vital contributions, little is known about their numbers, the burden of caregiving that they shoulder, or the resources that exist to support them. To shed light on these "hidden heroes," a RAND team conducted the largest, most comprehensive study to date of military caregivers.

  • They Also Serve: Understanding the Needs of Military Caregivers

    Nov 18, 2013

    Military families play a critical role in supporting U.S. servicemembers during deployment and afterwards. Equally vital but often less visible is the role played by those who care for the servicemembers who return with disabling injuries or illnesses and require long-term support beyond what the formal health care system provides.