Priority Criminal Justice Needs Initiative

Handcuffs on computer keyboard

Photo by Mark Oleksiy/Fotolia

On behalf of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the RAND Corporation in partnership with the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), RTI International, and the University of Denver is carrying out a research effort to assess and prioritize technology needs across the criminal justice community. This effort is a component of the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC) System, which is an integral part of NIJ's science and technology program.

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  • A police vehicle stops a sedan on a routine traffic stop photo by ASP Inc/Adobe Stock

    Report

    Autonomous Road Vehicles and Law Enforcement

    Jul 16, 2020

    Autonomous vehicles promise many benefits, but questions remain about how law enforcement officers will interact with them. What will be the biggest challenges—and how can law enforcement prepare to address them?

  • A woman shocked and upset by something on her phone, photo by AntonioGuillem/Getty Images

    Report

    Strategies for Countering Online Abuse

    Jun 18, 2020

    Digital platforms that let users interact virtually and often anonymously have given rise to harassment and other criminal behaviors. Tech-facilitated abuse—such as nonconsensual pornography, doxing, and swatting—compromises privacy and safety. How can law enforcement respond?

  • Police laboratory equipment including blood vials and with evidence bag

    Report

    Countering Drug-Impaired Driving: Addressing the Complexities of Gathering and Presenting Evidence

    May 7, 2020

    What challenges do law enforcement, toxicologists, and prosecutors face in identifying and prosecuting drug-impaired driving cases, and how can these challenges be addressed?

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