Priority Criminal Justice Needs Initiative

Handcuffs on computer keyboard

Photo by Mark Oleksiy/Fotolia

On behalf of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the RAND Corporation in partnership with the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), RTI International, and the University of Denver is carrying out a research effort to assess and prioritize technology needs across the criminal justice community. This effort is a component of the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC) System, which is an integral part of NIJ's science and technology program.

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  • The exterior wall of a prison surrounded by barbed wire fence. Photo by eddiesimages / Getty Images

    Report

    Risk and Needs Assessments in Prisons

    Sep 9, 2020

    Risk and needs assessment (RNA) tools are critical to interventions to reduce recidivism, but implementing such tools within prisons can be challenging. Additional training and guidance for leadership, evaluation of RNA tools, and research assessing the effectiveness of approaches are needed.

  • Police continue their patrols as officials begin what they are calling a slow and methodical clean-up and removal of a large homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River Trail in Anaheim, California, January 22, 2018, photo by Mike Blake/Reuters

    Report

    The Law Enforcement Response to Homelessness

    Aug 25, 2020

    To better understand the potential challenges of the law enforcement response to homelessness, this workshop of practitioners and researchers discussed current law enforcement responses and identified the highest-priority needs to support and improve existing efforts.

  • A police vehicle stops a sedan on a routine traffic stop photo by ASP Inc/Adobe Stock

    Report

    Autonomous Road Vehicles and Law Enforcement

    Jul 16, 2020

    Autonomous vehicles promise many benefits, but questions remain about how law enforcement officers will interact with them. What will be the biggest challenges—and how can law enforcement prepare to address them?

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