Center for Middle East Public Policy

Center for Middle East Public Policy

The RAND Center for Middle East Public Policy (CMEPP) brings together analytic excellence and regional expertise from across the RAND Corporation to address the most critical political, social, and economic challenges facing the Middle East today. Our goal is to inform policy in ways that help improve the security and well-being of people living in the region.

Research Areas

Latest Research

  • Beirut Madinati candidates and delegates cheer

    Middle Eastern Communities Can Resist Sectarianism

    Jan 14, 2019

    Martini, et al.

    Sectarian violence in the Middle East has been destructive, but it is still the exception rather than the norm. Communities are generally resilient to the worst sectarian impulses. Lessons from Lebanon, Bahrain, Syria, and Iraq show that there are a range of actions that can curb sectarianism.

  • Workers in a textile factory in Igdir, Turkey, May 20, 2017

    Win-Win Solutions for Syrian Refugees—and Their Hosts

    Dec 13, 2018

    Kumar , et al.

    Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan have generously received the majority of Syrian refugees. Many are working, but their sheer numbers have strained local labor markets, public services, and social harmony. Which policies might help create new economic opportunities for both the refugees and host-nation workers?

  • Dried herbs, flowers and spices at the spice souq in Dubai, UAE

    Food Security in the Gulf Cooperation Council

    Nov 28, 2018

    Efron , et al.

    Domestic food production is an ongoing challenge for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council. These countries are largely dependent on food imports and are subject to a number of potential disruptions. What strategies have they taken to increase domestic food production or facilitate access to imports?

  • Jerusalem skyline

    What if Palestinians Start Voting in Jerusalem City Elections?

    Oct 25, 2018

    Blake , et al.

    Since 1967, most Palestinian residents of Jerusalem have boycotted municipal elections to avoid legitimating Israeli rule. But recent polls suggest that some might be warming to the idea of voting. A game with Israeli and Palestinian policy experts examined possible consequences of the boycott ending.

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Recent Commentary

  • White House senior adviser Jared Kushner arrives for the U.S.-hosted “Peace to Prosperity” conference, in Manama, Bahrain, June 25, 2019, photo by Matt Spetalnick/Reuters

    Development with No Political Framework Is a Car Without an Engine

    Differing historical narratives, asymmetry of power, security concerns, upheaval in the larger region, poverty, and religious differences all make Israel-Palestine one of the world's most intractable conflicts. An early-summer meeting in Bahrain served as a sales session of sorts for the economic half of the Trump administration's proposal to solve it.

  • The purported wreckage of an American drone is seen displayed by the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) in Tehran, Iran, June 21, 2019, photo by Meghdad Madadi/Tasnim News Agency via Reuters

    The Flawed Logic of Proportionality

    Jul 1, 2019

    Raphael S. Cohen

    President Trump halted a retaliatory strike against Iran on the basis that it would have claimed many Iranian lives and was not proportionate to shooting down an unmanned drone. There are many good reasons to avoid attacking Iran, but if Washington must resort to force in the future, it should avoid the flawed logic of proportionality.

  • Bomb blasts and artillery fire thundered across Baghdad as U.S. forces tightened their grip on the capital's fringes and brought up more troops, April 6, 2003, photo by Faleh Kheiber/Reuters

    Changing the Way America Goes to War

    Jun 25, 2019

    Michael J. Mazarr

    America's vast power, and the weakness of most of its enemies, has allowed it to get away with a striking absence of deliberative judgment when deciding on war, as the Iraq case makes clear. But that free pass is coming to an end. It's time for the United States to rethink the way it decides on wars of choice.

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Our Work in Arabic

  • مؤسسة RAND في الشرق الأوسط: الموقع الإلكتروني باللغة العربية

    يقدم موقع RAND الإلكتروني باللغة العربية لمحة عامة عن عمل مؤسسة RAND في الشرق الأوسط، فضلاً عن تقديمه لبحوث مختلفة ذات صلة بالمنطقة. تجدون في هذا الموقع عدداً من الدراسات والأبحاث العلمية التي تتعلق بالصحة والتعليم والتحولات السياسية ومواضيع أخرى.

Focus on the Refugee Crisis

Preventing a Syrian Lost Generation

Since 2011, 12 million Syrians have fled their homes, either inside Syria or crossing its borders as refugees. To help shape policy that will improve the lives of refugees and support host communities over the longer term, RAND focuses its work on the greatest challenges related to this crisis: humanitarian assistance, education, jobs, and regional and global security.

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Photo of Dalia Kaye

Dalia Dassa Kaye

Director, Center for Middle East Public Policy; Senior Political Scientist

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