Center for Russia and Eurasia

The RAND Center for Russia and Eurasia (CRE) brings together experts from across RAND to shed light on the foreign policies, domestic developments, and economic relationships of the countries that succeeded the Soviet Union. Whether it's Russian defense planning, foreign investment in Ukraine, or assistance programs in Central Asia and the Caucasus, RAND researchers leverage multidisciplinary tools, deep regional knowledge, and a wealth of substantive expertise in economics, security, health, education, and other areas to improve understanding and policy both for those in the region and for those engaging it.

CRE also houses the RAND Business Leaders Forum (RBLF), a membership organization that convenes a select group of executives and policymakers from the United States, Russia, and Europe for dialogue on the broad array of strategic issues that face their countries and their companies.

Recent Commentary

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping meet on the sidelines of the G20 leaders summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 1, 2018, photo by Sputnik/Mikhail Klimentyev/Kremlin via Reuters

    A Warming Trend in China-Russia Relations

    Apr 18, 2019

    The China-Russia relationship is indeed growing across military, economic, and political dimensions, but it is still more anchored in shared grievances than in common visions. Both countries contest U.S. national interests, but in different ways. Washington should treat them as separate strategic challenges.

  • Map of Ukraine, photo by omersukrugoksu/Getty Images

    Book Review: Ukraine and the Art of Strategy by Lawrence Freedman

    Apr 16, 2019

    The crisis in Ukraine has proved a watershed moment for Russia's relations with the West. In Ukraine and the Art of Strategy, Lawrence Freedman presents a brief history of the conflict and analyzes it in the context of strategic theory.

  • Three tiny satellites photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station, October 4, 2012, photo by NASA

    Space Safety Coordination: A Norm for All Nations

    Apr 16, 2019

    As space becomes more congested with satellites of all sizes and types, the need for every nation to actively participate in the space safety coordination system grows. Most spacefaring countries participate, but a few countries do not—notably, Russia and China. That creates greater potential for collisions and hazards from debris.

  • Founder of the Baring Vostok private equity group Michael Calvey, who was detained on suspicion of fraud, sits inside a defendants' cage as he attends a court hearing in Moscow, Russia, February 15, 2019, photo by Tatyana Makeyeva/Reuters

    Investing in Russia's Future

    Mar 1, 2019

    Russia's economic problems can be traced to sanctions, lack of investment and lack of reform. The Kremlin has the power to address these problems. Reforms could unlock economic potential, and enable Russians to improve their living standards.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin, photo by the Russian Presidential Press and Information Office

    Russia's Soft Strategy to Hostile Measures in Europe

    Feb 26, 2019

    They've been called political warfare, measures short of war, gray zone warfare, and a host of other terms. Russia has used a wide range of hostile measures to expand its influence and undermine governments across the European continent. These tactics should be appreciated for what they are: part of a larger, coherent Russian effort, but ultimately not an insurmountable one.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a business forum, Delovaya Rossiya, in Moscow, February 6, 2019, photo by Maxim Shemetov/Reuters

    Russia Chooses Paupers as Partners, with Questionable Benefit

    Feb 14, 2019

    By leveraging the efficiencies of globalization and cultivating ties with prosperous partners, Russia could increase its economic potential and improve living standards for its people. And by engaging more positively with the world, it could gain influence in the forums that matter, such as the G20 and multilateral institutions.

  • World map with chess pieces with flags of Russia, China, and the United States, photo by theasis/Getty Images

    The Need to Think More Clearly About 'Great-Power Competition'

    Feb 11, 2019

    Today's world order is increasingly defined by competition between the United States and a host of major powers, especially China and Russia. Who is America's principal competitor and over what is it competing? What is America’s ultimate objective? And how will it prepare its economy and its society for infinite competition of an indefinite nature?

More commentary from CRE researchers »