Homeland Security Research Division

The Homeland Security Research Division (HSRD) is the research unit within RAND that houses the Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center, an FFRDC operated by RAND under contract with the Department of Homeland Security. HSRD also serves as the platform by which RAND communicates relevant research from across its units with the broader homeland security enterprise.

Explore Research on Homeland Security Issues

  • Petty Officer 1st Class Krystyna Duffy, a boatswain's mate assigned to Coast Guard Station Golden Gate in San Francisco, drives a 47-foot Motor Lifeboat near the Golden Gate Bridge, February 8, 2018, photo by PO3 Sarah Wi/U.S. Coast Guard

    Research Brief

    Why Do Women Leave the Coast Guard, and What Could Encourage Them to Stay?

    Mar 29, 2019

    Women leave the Coast Guard at higher rates than men. Focus groups raised concerns about work environment, career issues, and personal life matters. More inclusive personnel policies could help the Coast Guard address these concerns and retain more women.

  • An illustration of a double helix with binary code. Photo by ymgerman / Getty Images

    Report

    Assessing the Need for and Uses of Sequences of Interest Databases

    Mar 21, 2019

    Advances in biotechnology have created opportunities for malicious actors to harness available tools to create biological threats. A workshop of key experts considered how a genetic database of "sequences of interest" could improve the safety and security of biotechnology research.

  • A woman speaking in a community meeting, photo by Hero Images/Getty Images

    Research Brief

    How to Strengthen Terrorism Prevention Efforts

    Feb 14, 2019

    Shortfalls in national terrorism prevention efforts have come not only from limited programmatic focus and resource investment, but also from critics seeking to constrain or halt such efforts. The most effective path for the U.S. government would be to support state, local, nongovernmental, and private terrorism prevention efforts rather than building capabilities itself.

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