Homeland Security Research Division

The Homeland Security Research Division (HSRD) is the research unit within RAND that houses the Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center, an FFRDC operated by RAND under contract with the Department of Homeland Security. HSRD also serves as the platform by which RAND communicates relevant research from across its units with the broader homeland security enterprise.

Explore Research on Homeland Security Issues

  • Digital network connection lines of Sathorn intersection, Bangkok Downtown, Thailand. Photo by tampatra / Adobe Stock

    Report

    Developing Metrics and Scoring Procedures to Support Mitigation Grant Program Decisionmaking

    Mar 31, 2021

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency commissioned development of metrics that can inform decisionmaking for awarding predisaster mitigation grants. This report establishes three lines of effort for analysis: indirect benefits, applicant institutional capability, and community resilience.

  • Disaster Survivor Assistance Team (DSAT) members assess damage in the area following Hurricane Laura. Photo by Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA

    Brochure

    Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center: 2019–2020 Annual Report

    Mar 22, 2021

    To support the U.S. Department of Homeland Security across its missions, the Homeland Security Operational Analysis Center provides the department and its components with independent and objective analyses and advice in core areas important to the department. This is the center's 2019–2020 annual report.

  • U.S. Department of Homeland Security seal on the podium during the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Ajo Border Patrol Station in Why, Arizona, August 19, 2010, photo by Lee Roberts/USACE

    Commentary

    The Essential Role of DHS in the Economic Recovery from COVID-19

    Feb 11, 2021

    The name Department of Homeland Security belies an important set of roles, missions, and functions of the department related to the economic security of the United States. Wielding these powers to their full extent during the COVID-19 pandemic could set the conditions for a more rapid recovery.

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