National Security Research Division

The RAND National Security Research Division (NSRD) conducts research and analysis for the U.S. government, U.S. allies, and private foundations. The division operates the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC).

Commentary

  • European Union flags fly outside the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, April 10, 2019, photo by Yves Herman/Reuters

    Rethinking the EU's Role in European Collective Defence

    May 20, 2022

    Russia's invasion of Ukraine is forcing European nations to quickly re-evaluate how best to maintain their collective security. This makes the concept of European strategic autonomy—the EU's increased ability to operate independently and with partners of choice on defence and security matters—more relevant than ever.

  • South Korea's new President Kim Dae-jung waves on the grounds of the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, February 25, 1998, photo by Str Old/Reuters

    Three Principles for Korean Peninsula Peace and Security

    May 20, 2022

    In his inaugural address in 1998, former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung defined three principles for Korean peninsula peace and security. How might these principles be adjusted to manage today's changing North Korean threats and the Korean security environment?

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Latest Publications

  • A doctor giving a vaccine to a military service member, photo by South_agency/Getty Images

    Assessing Burnout Among Military Health Care Providers

    May 3, 2022

    Health care provider burnout poses a threat to mental and behavioral health care for service members, veterans, and their families. How prevalent is burnout? What workplace factors are associated with increased risk for burnout? And what interventions could help?

  • Blue and red cables transmitting data signals, image by Alexey Novikov/Adobe Stock

    Response Options to Cyberattacks on U.S. Government Networks

    Apr 29, 2022

    The United States has proved vulnerable to cyber incidents, and a lack of response has emboldened Russia and China to expand their cyber espionage activities. Have U.S. responses changed over time or affected adversary behavior? What lessons do these cases offer for future policymaking?

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