National Security Research Division

The RAND National Security Research Division (NSRD) conducts research and analysis for the U.S. government, U.S. allies, and private foundations. The division operates the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC).

Commentary

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Latest Publications

  • Female service member sitting on a couch, photo by Prostock-Studio/Getty Images

    Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault in Military Settings

    Members of the military who have been victims of sexual assault or sexual harassment often experience PTSD, depression, and substance use disorders. What therapies are effective at treating these conditions? And what barriers prevent service members from getting the care that they need?

    Jan 9, 2023

  • Members of China's research team setting up an ocean profiling float near the icebreaker Xuelong in the Arctic Ocean, August 18, 2016, photo by Wu Yue/Xinhua/Alamy

    China's Growing Role in the Arctic

    China has become a player in the Arctic region, engaging in economic, scientific, cultural, diplomatic, and military activities. What security risks do China's investments pose, and what could the United States and its partners do to mitigate undesirable Chinese involvement in the region?

    Dec 23, 2022

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Essays

  • The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63) conducting a port visit in Sydney, Australia

    The Challenges to Making AUKUS Work

    Senior political scientist Jennifer D. Moroney writes in Security & Defence PLuS that for AUKUS to reach its potential, it will need to overcome barriers in terms of policies, legislation, management structures, and information-sharing practices.

  • Residents of Raqqa gather in the morning to drink tea after they had been allowed back to inspect their homes, photo by Aboud Hamam

    Civilian Casualties: Lessons from the Battle for Raqqa

    The United States' emphasis on minimizing civilian harm in Raqqa, Syria, was quite clear and strong up and down the chain of command. But the way in which the U.S. military waged war in Raqqa too often undercut that commitment. The Pentagon asked RAND to find out what happened.

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