National Security Research Division

The RAND National Security Research Division (NSRD) conducts research and analysis for the U.S. government, U.S. allies, and private foundations. The division operates the National Defense Research Institute (NDRI), a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC).

Commentary

  • The Second Battalion of the 99th Brigade of the Republic of China Marine Corps at the Presidential Palace in Taipei, Taiwan, July 6, 2020, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/presidentialoffice/50082396406/in/photostream/">photo</a> by Wang Yu Ching/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>

    The Counterintuitive Sensibility of Taiwan's New Defense Strategy

    Dec 6, 2021

    As the United States prepares to deter China from attacking Taiwan and defend it from an attack, are the Taiwanese themselves doing everything they can to defend their territory?

  • Military parade after the 2021 coup d'&eacute;tat in Kaloum, Guinea, September 6, 2021, photo by Aboubacarkhoraa/CC BY 4.0 International

    Are Military Coups Back in Style in Africa?

    Dec 1, 2021

    There have been five coups in sub-Saharan Africa since August 2020. On a continent that was recently lauded for its democratic advancement, this backsliding suggests the military coup may be dangerously back in fashion. Why are more coups happening now?

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Latest Publications

  • Presidents Barack Obama and Nicolas Sarkozy at a ceremony honoring service members who supported the international response to the unrest in Libya, at Cannes City Hall, November 4, 2011, photo by MC2 Stephen Oleksiak/U.S. Navy

    Weighing Entanglement Risks of U.S. Security Relationships

    Nov 22, 2021

    Some analysts argue that security relationships cause the United States to adopt its partners' interests, incentivize allies and partners to engage in reckless behavior, and risk getting dragged into conflicts. Others contend that the United States avoids entanglement by keeping its own interests in mind.

  • The Baltic Way demonstration on the Riga-Bauska highway, near Kekava, Latvia, August 23, 1989, photo by Uldis Pinka/CC-BY-SA

    Civilian Resilience in the Baltic States

    Nov 1, 2021

    Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania have a history of resistance to foreign occupation. If the countries were occupied today, civilians could play a powerful role in their defense. They could impose costs on the occupier, deny consolidation, reduce capacity for repression, secure allied support, and expand popular support.

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