Publication Guidelines for Quality Improvement in Health Care

Evolution of the SQUIRE Project

Published In: Quality and Safety In Health Care, v. 17, Suppl. 1, Oct. 2008, p. i3-i9

Posted on RAND.org on December 31, 2007

by Frank Davidoff, Paul Batalden, David P Stevens, Greg Ogrinc, Susan Mooney

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In 2005, draft guidelines were published for reporting studies of quality improvement interventions as the initial step in a consensus process for development of a more definitive version. This article contains the full revised version of the guidelines, which the authors refer to as SQUIRE (Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence). This paper also describes the consensus process, which included informal feedback from authors, editors and peer reviewers who used the guidelines; formal written commentaries; input from a group of publication guideline developers; ongoing review of the literature on the epistemology of improvement and methods for evaluating complex social programmes; a two-day meeting of stakeholders for critical discussion and debate of the guidelinesgas content and wording; and commentary on sequential versions of the guidelines from an expert consultant group. Finally, the authors consider the major differences between SQUIRE and the initial draft guidelines; limitations of and unresolved questions about SQUIRE; ancillary supporting documents and alternative versions that are under development; and plans for dissemination, testing and further development of SQUIRE.

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