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RAND work in law, business, and regulation includes analyses of alternative dispute resolution, asbestos litigation, workers' compensation, insurance, and other civil justice matters. This research often has implications for the private sector, such as entrepreneurs facing legal and regulatory hurdles, or multinational corporations dealing with corporate ethics and governance issues.

  • Smart car 3D rendering, photo by Production Perig/Adobe Stock

    Research Brief

    When an Autonomous Vehicle Is Hacked, Who Is Liable?

    Jul 12, 2019

    Even if the likelihood is small, hacks on autonomous vehicles could lead to deaths, property destruction, ransomware attacks, or data theft. Several scenarios, such as a hacker disabling a car to demand ransom, illustrate the policy challenges facing the civil legal system, insurers, and others.

  • Equations and formulas behind scales of justice, images by monsitj and DNY59/Getty Images

    Report

    Addressing the Challenges of Algorithmic Equity

    Jul 11, 2019

    Social institutions increasingly use algorithms for decisionmaking purposes. How do different perspectives on equity or fairness inform the use of algorithms in the context of auto insurance pricing, job recruitment, and criminal justice?

Explore Law and Business

  • White prescription pills on a U.S. $100 bill, photo by Stuart Ritchie/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Price-Fixing Case Reveals Vulnerability of Generic Drug Policies

    A massive lawsuit filed by 44 states accuses 20 major drug makers of colluding for years to inflate prices on more than 100 generic drugs, including those to treat HIV, cancer, and depression. If true, the alleged behavior is not just a violation of antitrust law, but also a betrayal of the government policies that created and defended the entire generic drug industry.

    Jul 15, 2019

  • Report

    When Autonomous Vehicles Are Hacked, Who Is Liable?

    The arrival of autonomous vehicles (AVs) on the roads will require policymakers, industry, and the public to adapt to the risk of hackers attacking these vehicles. RAND researchers explored the civil liability issues related to hacked AVs.

    Jul 12, 2019

  • White House senior adviser Jared Kushner arrives for the U.S.-hosted “Peace to Prosperity” conference, in Manama, Bahrain, June 25, 2019, photo by Matt Spetalnick/Reuters

    Commentary

    Development with No Political Framework Is a Car Without an Engine

    Differing historical narratives, asymmetry of power, security concerns, upheaval in the larger region, poverty, and religious differences all make Israel-Palestine one of the world's most intractable conflicts. An early-summer meeting in Bahrain served as a sales session of sorts for the economic half of the Trump administration's proposal to solve it.

    Jul 9, 2019

  • Tim Wolf talks about his father at a memorial at RAND's headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif., January 26, 2017, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Content

    Tim Wolf: Carrying on His Family's Commitment to RAND

    Charles Wolf, Jr. was an economist who spent more than 60 years at RAND and was the founding dean of what is now the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He and his wife, Theresa, included a $1 million bequest in their estate plans to support the school and its students. It's a commitment his son Tim plans to carry forward.

    Jul 9, 2019

  • An adult son watches his mother cook, photo by DGLimages/Getty Images

    News Release

    Parents Who Support Unemployed Adult Children Curb Their Own Behavior

    Parents who financially help their unemployed adult children offset such costs by adjusting their behavior, particularly by spending less money on food, working more, and reducing retirement savings.

    Jul 9, 2019

  • Arthur Brooks, author and Pardee RAND alumnus, discussing his new book at RAND's headquarters in Santa Monica, California, May 17, 2019, photo by Diane Baldwin/RAND Corporation

    Blog

    New Book by Arthur Brooks Tells Americans to Answer Hate with Love

    Arthur Brooks spoke at a RAND event to discuss his new book, Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America from the Culture of Contempt. He stressed that we don't have to disagree less but that we have to disagree better.

    Jul 8, 2019

  • Protesters break the windows of the Legislative Council building on the anniversary of Hong Kong's handover to China in Hong Kong, July 1, 2019, photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters

    Commentary

    Beijing Won't Allow Its Hong Kong Integration Experiment to Fail

    Recent events in Hong Kong have posed the stiffest challenge yet to Beijing's sovereignty. If sustained, they could push China to react to protect its national interests.

    Jul 3, 2019

  • Journal Article

    The Impact of Climate and Weather on a Small Tourism Business: A wSWOT Case Study

    This teaching case explores the impact of climatic trends and weather on one location of an outdoor tourism industry business in the coastal community of Virginia Beach, Virginia.

    Jul 3, 2019

  • Journal Article

    A Case Study of Climate Change, Extreme Weather Events, and Risk Communication in a Coastal Community

    A longitudinal case study with a single location design was used to explore the relationships between climate change, extreme events, and economic outcomes for a coastal business located in the southeastern U.S.

    Jul 3, 2019

  • The purported wreckage of an American drone is seen displayed by the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) in Tehran, Iran, June 21, 2019, photo by Meghdad Madadi/Tasnim News Agency via Reuters

    Commentary

    The Flawed Logic of Proportionality

    President Trump halted a retaliatory strike against Iran on the basis that it would have claimed many Iranian lives and was not proportionate to shooting down an unmanned drone. There are many good reasons to avoid attacking Iran, but if Washington must resort to force in the future, it should avoid the flawed logic of proportionality.

    Jul 1, 2019

  • Periodical

    RAND Review: July-August 2019

    This issue spotlights a strategy to reduce roadway deaths to zero; a school principal initiative that yielded positive results for schools and students; and a data-driven effort to enhance equity in a major U.S. city.

    Jul 1, 2019

  • woman reading her cell phone while sitting on stairs, photo by Mixmike/Getty Images

    News Release

    Social Marketing Campaign to Reduce Mental Illness Stigma May Have Helped Those in Need

    People who recalled seeing or hearing aspects of a social marketing campaign in California intended to reduce stigma about mental health issues were more likely to seek treatment for their symptoms of mental distress than those who did not recall the campaign.

    Jun 26, 2019

  • Bomb blasts and artillery fire thundered across Baghdad as U.S. forces tightened their grip on the capital's fringes and brought up more troops, April 6, 2003, photo by Faleh Kheiber/Reuters

    Commentary

    Changing the Way America Goes to War

    America's vast power, and the weakness of most of its enemies, has allowed it to get away with a striking absence of deliberative judgment when deciding on war, as the Iraq case makes clear. But that free pass is coming to an end. It's time for the United States to rethink the way it decides on wars of choice.

    Jun 25, 2019

  • Journal Article

    Drug Offences: Assessment of Guideline

    Using data collection exercises in the Crown and magistrates courts, researchers helped identify whether sentencing outcomes for drug and theft offences changed after new guidelines came into force, and examined factors affecting sentencing practice.

    Jun 25, 2019

  • A protester poses for a portrait during a rally against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's government in Caracas, February 2, 2019, photo by Carlos Barria/Reuters

    Commentary

    What Should the United States Do About Venezuela?

    If it becomes evident that Maduro isn't about to fall, then the Trump administration should revisit its sanctions and rescind those that weigh most heavily on the Venezuelan people, while targeting and isolating the regime.

    Jun 24, 2019

  • A composite image of a United States Coast Guard boat and a digital graph. Photos by Petty Officer 3rd Class Lisa Ferdinando, U.S. Coast Guard, MicroStockHub/GettyImages

    Report

    Development of Standardized and Best Practices for the USCG Boats Acquisition Program

    This report contains a review of the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) boats acquisition program and the programs of similar organizations inside and outside the USCG, possible funding and structural strategies, and recommendations for USCG leadership.

    Jun 24, 2019

  • Australia technology of internet of things IOT big data cloud computing, conceptual 3D render by immimagery/AdobeStock

    Report

    Designing a Capability Development Framework for Home Affairs

    Australia's Department of Home Affairs is seeking to establish an auditable, transparent and evidence-based approach to capability lifecycle management. The authors of this report describe a principles-based model to meet the department's needs.

    Jun 24, 2019

  • Protesters outside police headquarters demand Hong Kong's leaders to step down and withdraw the extradition bill, in Hong Kong, June 21, 2019, photo by Tyrone Siu/Reuters

    Commentary

    One Country, Two Systems, Lots of Problems

    The enormous protests in Hong Kong since spring have led to fresh fears about the viability of China's "one country, two systems" policy. It's an idea that Macau and Hong Kong officially subscribe to and Taiwan fiercely resists—but one increasingly questioned from all sides.

    Jun 21, 2019