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RAND's research on law, business, and government includes analyses of the criminal and civil justice systems, governments and political systems, international trade and economic development, and the banking and finance sectors. Notable studies have addressed the effects of gun policies in the United States and liability in the age of autonomous vehicles.

  • The U.S. Supreme Court building at night, photo by renaschild/Getty Images

    Report

    Ambiguities of Bruen Decision Will Affect State Gun Regulation

    The Supreme Court's decision in Bruen extended beyond New York's carry laws, raising broader questions about the constitutionality of other federal and state firearm laws. Courts deciding these cases will likely have to construct some new model of analyzing the surge of Second Amendment cases.

    Nov 4, 2022

  • Interior of Dog Tag Bakery with people ordering at the counter and sitting at tables, photo courtesy of Dog Tag Inc.

    Essay

    Dog Tag Bakery: A Fresh Start for Veterans

    A bakery in Washington, D.C., brings together service-disabled post–9/11 veterans, military spouses, and caregivers. For five months, they are immersed in an intensive entrepreneurial-focused business program. It's become a model for helping veterans and others in the military community reestablish their lives.

    Nov 1, 2022

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  • Report

    Report

    Spending Trajectories After Age 65: Variation by Initial Wealth

    This report presents estimates of household spending trajectories from age 65 through the retirement years and how the trajectories vary by initial wealth position. The results help to anticipate and plan for household spending needs at older ages.

    Dec 5, 2022

  • RAND Weekly Recap

    Blog

    Protests in China, Negotiating with Russia, L.A.'s 'Mansion Tax': RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on protests in China amid the government's zero-COVID policy, the potential harm in negotiating with Russia, building more affordable housing in Los Angeles, and more.

    Dec 2, 2022

  • A pedestrian passes a help wanted sign in the door of a hardware store in Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 8, 2022, photo by Brian Snyder/Reuters

    Commentary

    How COVID-19 Transformed the Jobs Market

    The COVID-19 pandemic initially devastated the U.S. economy. It also exposed and exacerbated existing inequities in society. But in as yet unpredictable ways, it may have accelerated profound changes in how labor works today.

    Dec 1, 2022

  • People hold white sheets of paper in protest over COVID-19 restrictions in Beijing, China, November 27, 2022, photo by Thomas Peter/Reuters

    Commentary

    Five Factors to Watch as the Chinese Communist Party Faces Protests

    It may be too soon to compare protests against China's zero-COVID policy to the Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement. However, looking back to 1989 can still provide valuable insights into what might happen next.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • The Central Intelligence Agency flag displayed onstage during a national security conference in Washington, D.C., October 27, 2015, photo by Yuri Gripas/Reuters

    Commentary

    Intelligence Work Is Exciting. And Traumatizing

    The intelligence community needs to communicate to its workforce about the varied forms of trauma, how it affects individuals, and what resources exist to help. Protecting the intelligence workforce can help protect us all.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • Railway workers repair the tracks damaged by Russian shelling in the northern direction, Kharkiv Region, northeastern Ukraine, November 25, 2022, photo by Vyacheslav Madiyevskyy/Ukrinform/Abacapress.com via Reuters

    Commentary

    Politics of Ukrainian Reconstruction

    When fighting subsides, Ukraine may undergo reconstruction on the scale of the post–World War II Marshall Plan. Debate is ramping up about core issues, such as the scope of reconstruction, sources of funding, and reforms needed for success. Ukraine and the West might begin now to forge consensus on these issues.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • Three drones are set up at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, August 10, 2020, photo by Spc. Khalil Jenkins/U.S. Army

    Report

    A New Era of Major-Power Competition

    While there is a general consensus that the United States is now in a new era of strategic competition with China and Russia, there is not yet a clear understanding of what that means or what forms it could take. How can the United States best position itself to succeed?

    Nov 30, 2022

  • Abstract representation of civic infrastructure, image by CSA-Printstock/Getty Images, design by Pete Soriano/RAND Corporation

    Report

    Defining and Measuring Civic Infrastructure

    Is the United States in a civic crisis? Or is American democracy simply evolving? A framework for defining and measuring civic infrastructure can help answer these questions—and preserve a healthy democracy.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • Report

    Report

    USCG Project Evergreen V: Compilation of Activities and Summary of Results

    This report summarizes the findings of Evergreen V, the most recent iteration of an ongoing U.S. Coast Guard initiative aimed at identifying emerging challenges and future trends so that senior leaders can plan for the long term.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer readies himself for the tie-down evolution in deck landing qualification exercises.

    Research Brief

    Activities and Results from U.S. Coast Guard Project Evergreen V

    This brief summarizes the findings of U.S. Coast Guard Project Evergreen V, part of a long-term strategic planning effort to identify emerging challenges and future trends that might alter demand for missions and the ability to perform them.

    Nov 30, 2022

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Partially Different? The Importance of General Equilibrium in Health Economic Evaluations: An Application to Nocturia

    The main findings of this study highlight the magnitude of general equilibrium effects when assessing the potential productivity costs associated with health conditions.

    Nov 29, 2022

  • Visitors to the ASML booth during the 5th China International Import Expo in Shanghai, China, November 7, 2022, photo by CFOTO/Sipa USA via Reuters Connect

    Commentary

    Export Controls Give ASML and the Netherlands an Opportunity to Lead by Example. Will They Take It?

    Dutch tech company ASML makes the complex machines required to construct advanced microchips, and it sells many of these machines to China. Harmonization of export controls between the United States and the Netherlands could limit China's development of military technologies and its human rights abuses.

    Nov 28, 2022

  • Workers build a new apartment building in Los Angeles, California, July 30, 2018, photo by Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

    Commentary

    Measure ULA Reflects the Wrong Lessons from Proposition HHH

    Los Angeles voters approved the so-called “mansion tax,” Measure ULA, which proponents suggested will raise funds for about 26,000 new units of affordable housing over the next decade. But a key labor provision casts doubt on that optimistic projection.

    Nov 28, 2022

  • Report

    Report

    Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Analyses: Update Through Fiscal Year 2021

    RAND researchers present a descriptive overview of the state of the defense acquisition workforce (AW), describe changes to the AW over time, and identify opportunities for the collection of new data that could support decisionmaking.

    Nov 28, 2022

  • RAND Weekly Recap

    Blog

    Taiwan, Putin's Holy War, Mining the Moon: RAND Weekly Recap

    This weekly recap focuses on why China likely won't attack Taiwan anytime soon, Vladimir Putin's “holy war” in Ukraine, why it's time to make rules for space-mining, and more.

    Nov 25, 2022

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Saving Regret and Procrastination

    Saving regret, or the wish in hindsight to have saved more earlier in life, is widespread in older populations. Little of the variation is explained by procrastination and psychological factors. Unemployment, health, and divorce are larger factors.

    Nov 23, 2022

  • Report

    Report

    The role of evidence in occupational safety and health

    This study aimed to explore and identify globally: (i) what types of evidence are produced, shared and used, and by whom, and (ii) how OSH decisions are informed and the role evidence plays in this process.

    Nov 23, 2022

  • Young Afro-Latina mother taking temperature of her child in bed, photo by Vesnaandjic/Getty Images

    Commentary

    Working Moms' Winter Math Is Getting Tougher

    Working mothers remain disproportionately responsible for raising children, and no one can work and take care of sick kids at the same time. In the coming months, the tripledemic of COVID, the flu, and RSV will pull a lot of working mothers out of the office for days at a stretch, compounding the obstacles that women already face.

    Nov 22, 2022

  • People gather around remains of a military plane at the site where it crashed into a residential building in the city of Irkutsk, Russia, October 23, 2022, photo by Stringer/Reuters

    Commentary

    Russian Aircraft Keep Crashing. Could Sanctions Be the Cause?

    At least six fixed-wing Russian aircraft have crashed over Russian-controlled airspace since September. Sanctions placed on Russia by the West could well be affecting Russia's ability to manufacture and maintain parts needed to keep aircraft safe.

    Nov 22, 2022

  • Journal Article

    Journal Article

    Incentives and Reminders to Improve Long-term Medication Adherence (INMIND): Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    This study aims to test the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a novel intervention that uses SMS text messages and conditional incentives to support ART initiators in establishing pill-taking habits.

    Nov 22, 2022