Cognitive Processing Therapy for Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and Alcohol Use Disorders

Published in: Addictive Behaviors, v. 39, no. 2, Feb. 2014, p. 420-427

Posted on RAND.org on February 01, 2014

by Debra L. Kaysen, Jeremiah Schumm, Eric R. Pedersen, Richard W. Seim, Michele Bedard-Gilligan, Kathleen Chard

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Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol-use disorders (AUD) frequently present comorbidly in veteran populations. Traditionally those with alcohol dependence have been excluded from PTSD treatment outcome studies, thus we do not know how those with alcohol dependence may tolerate or respond to PTSD-specific interventions; no studies to date have examined the extent to which cognitive PTSD interventions are tolerated or effective for those with comorbid PTSD/AUD. The present study examines the extent to which CPT is tolerated by and effective in treating PTSD symptoms for veterans with PTSD and AUD, as compared to veterans with PTSD only in an outpatient treatment setting. Data were obtained through chart review of 536 veterans diagnosed with PTSD who had received at least 1 session of CPT at a Midwestern US Veterans Affairs hospital. Nearly half (n = 264, 49.3%) of the veterans in the study exhibited a current or past AUD diagnosis. Participants were grouped into the following diagnostic groups: current AUD (past 12 months), past AUD (prior to 12 months), and no AUD. Participants completed an average of 9 sessions of CPT with no significant difference between AUD diagnostic groups on the number of CPT sessions completed. Individuals with past AUD had higher initial symptoms of self-reported PTSD symptoms than those with no AUD. All groups reported significant reductions in PTSD symptoms and depression over time. Overall, the results suggest that CPT appears well tolerated among veterans with comorbid AUD and is associated with significant reductions in symptoms of PTSD and depression in an outpatient treatment setting.

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