Barriers and Facilitators to Implementation of VA Home-Based Primary Care on American Indian Reservations

A Qualitative Multi-Case Study

Published in: Implementation Science, Volume 12 (September 2017), page 109. doi: 10.1186/s13012-017-0632-6

Posted on RAND.org on September 19, 2017

by B. Josea Kramer, Sarah D. Cote, Diane I. Lee, Beth Creekmur, Debra Saliba

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Veterans Health Affairs (VA) home-based primary care (HBPC) is an evidence-based interdisciplinary approach to non-institutional long-term care that was developed in urban settings to provide longitudinal care for vulnerable older patients. Under the authority of a Memorandum of Understanding between VA and Indian Health Service (IHS) to improve access to healthcare, 14 VA medical centers (VAMC) independently initiated plans to expand HBPC programs to rural American Indian reservations and 12 VAMC successfully implemented programs. The purpose of this study is to describe barriers and facilitators to implementation in rural Native communities with the aim of informing planners and policy-makers for future program expansions.

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