The Global Course of the Information Revolution: Technological Trends

Proceedings of an International Conference

by Robert H. Anderson, Philip S. Anton, Steven C. Bankes, Tora K. Bikson, Jonathan P. Caulkins, Peter Denning, James A. Dewar, Richard Hundley, C. Richard Neu

Full Document

FormatFile SizeNotes
zip file 0.4 MB

The file(s) provided above are ZIP-formatted archives, which most modern systems can natively unpack. If your computer does not unpack the archive when you double-click it, you may need to use a separate decompression program such as UnZip.

Reports on a conference sponsored by the National Intelligence Council in May 2000 that concentrated on technical trends in the information revolution, focusing in particular on the resulting new artifacts and services that might become widespread during the next 20 years. Participants saw a convergence of voice and data communications and a quantum jump in bandwidth during the next two decades, along with limited machine translation. A multitude of diverse, powerful, inexpensive sensors and devices capable of limited-distance wireless communications will come onto the market and computing and information systems will become much more ubiquitous, with convergence of wireless telephones, voice and e-mail messaging, and smart appliances. A likely shift in business emphasis from products to services will have an impact in such areas as health care, education, entertainment, and supply-chain management. Participants also discussed individual and societal tensions that could arise from these developments, such as battles between advocates of “open” and “closed” worlds of protocols and standards, and the threats to intellectual property rights and to individual privacy.

Table of Contents

  • Preface

  • Figures

    Figures and Tables

  • Summary

  • Acknowledgments

  • Acronyms

  • Chapter One

    Introduction

  • Chapter Two

    Future Visions

  • Chapter Three

    Observations on Future Trends

  • Chapter Four

    Technology Trends and Artifacts

  • Chapter Five

    Services

  • Chapter Six

    Markets

  • Chapter Seven

    Beyond Cyberspace

  • Chapter Eight

    Some Observations on the Group Reports

  • Chapter Nine

    Concluding Remarks

  • Chapter Ten

    What Comes Next

  • Appendix A

    Predicting the Unpredictable: Technology and Society

  • Appendix B

    Conference Participants

  • Appendix C

    Conference Agenda

  • Bibliography

This report is part of the RAND Corporation conference proceeding series. RAND conference proceedings present a collection of papers delivered at a conference or a summary of the conference.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.