Cover: Engaging Russia as Partner and Participant

Engaging Russia as Partner and Participant

The Next Stage of NATO-Russia Relations

Published 2004

by Robert E. Hunter, Sergey M. Rogov

Download

Download eBook for Free

Full Document

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.3 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Summary Only

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.1 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 Format Price
Add to Cart Paperback82 pages $25.00

Relations between the Russian Federation and the West have evolved steadily since the end of the Cold War, especially since the NATO-Russia Council (NRC) was established in May 2002. In late 2001, the RAND Corporation and the Institute for the USA and Canada Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISKRAN) created a North American-European-Russian working group to examine the growing cooperation between the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and Russia and to suggest ways to foster it. The Working Group on NATO-Russia relations does not suggest that Russia seek or be offered NATO membership. Rather, the group suggests that Russia become more deeply involved, as an equal partner, in NATO deliberations, including in regard to the Middle East, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. It also suggests fostering practical cooperation at all levels, including militarily, in areas of mutual concern. The goal is that NATO and Russia should share responsibilities and reinforce efforts to build security and free societies across Eurasia.

"…Based on the conference proceedings of several meetings (2002-04) of a 42-member North American-European-Russian working group established by the RAND Corporation and the Institute for the USA and Canada Studies of the Russian Academy of Sciences in late 2001. It was created to examine the growing cooperation between NATO and Russia and to suggest ways to foster it… This report is essential for understanding what the new goals for NATO-Russia cooperation after 2006 might be. It is important to understand the changing role of NATO within the US National Defense Strategy and the importance of areas of cooperation beyond the NATO-Russia framework. This is why potential differences in vision and policy assessments are important."

- Survival, March 2006

The work described here was supported by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the RAND Corporation, and the Foundation for East-West Bridges of Moscow and was performed by the RAND National Security Research Division.

This report is part of the RAND conference proceeding series. RAND conference proceedings present a collection of papers delivered at a conference or a summary of the conference.

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited; linking directly to this product page is encouraged. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial purposes. For information on reprint and reuse permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.

RAND is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.