Underusers of Mammogram Screening

Stage of Adoption in Five U.S. Subpopulations

Published in: Preventive Medicine, v. 27, no. 3, May/June 1998, p. 478-487

Posted on RAND.org on December 31, 1997

by Anne M. Stoddard, Barbara K. Rimer, Dorothy Lane, Sarah Fox, Isaac Lipkus, Roger Luckmann, Jill Spitz Avrunin, Susan Sprachman, Mary S. Costanza, Nicole Urban

Read More

Access further information on this document at www.sciencedirect.com

This article was published outside of RAND. The full text of the article can be found at the link above.

The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics of women ages 50 to 80 who do not follow commonly accepted mammography screening guidelines. It provides unique understanding of the robustness of characteristics of underusers across five different U.S. subpopulations. The findings suggest a need to encourage regular screening through effective communication from a health care provider. Intervention messages should be designed to increase the pros of mammography, decrease the cons, and highlight these differentially according to the soman's stage of adoption.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation External publication series. Many RAND studies are published in peer-reviewed scholarly journals, as chapters in commercial books, or as documents published by other organizations.

Our mission to help improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis is enabled through our core values of quality and objectivity and our unwavering commitment to the highest level of integrity and ethical behavior. To help ensure our research and analysis are rigorous, objective, and nonpartisan, we subject our research publications to a robust and exacting quality-assurance process; avoid both the appearance and reality of financial and other conflicts of interest through staff training, project screening, and a policy of mandatory disclosure; and pursue transparency in our research engagements through our commitment to the open publication of our research findings and recommendations, disclosure of the source of funding of published research, and policies to ensure intellectual independence. For more information, visit www.rand.org/about/principles.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.