Managed Care and the Growth of Competition

Published in: Changing the U.S. Health Care System: Key Issues in Health Services Policy and Management, 2nd Ed. / Edited by R.M. Andersen, T.H. Rice, G.R. Kominski (San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Inc., 2001), Chapter 15, p. 389-405

Posted on RAND.org on January 01, 2001

by Gerald Kominski, Glenn Melnick

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Several significant incremental health care reforms were enacted by Congress during the 1990s. However, the failure to pass comprehensive national health care reform legislation meant that responsibility for restructuring the health care system fell primarily on the private sector and individual states. This chapter offers a review and synthesis of the empirical literature on the effects of managed care and competition and discusses the implications of current trends, what we have learned to date, and some directions for future research.

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