Consumer-involved Participatory Research to Address General Medical Health and Wellness in a Community Mental Health Setting

Published in: Psychiatric Services, v. 66, no. 12, Dec. 2015, p. 1268-1270

Posted on RAND.org on July 30, 2015

by Sharat P. Iyer, Laura S. Pancake, Elizabeth S. Dandino, Kenneth B. Wells

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Barriers to sustainably implementing general medical interventions in community mental health (CMH) settings include role uncertainty, consumer engagement, workforce limitations, and sustainable reimbursement. To address these barriers, this project used a community-partnered participatory research framework to create a stakeholder-based general medical and wellness intervention in a large CMH organization, with consumers involved in all decision-making processes. Consumers faced practical barriers to participating in organizational decision making, but their narratives were critical in establishing priorities and ensuring sustainability. Addressing baseline knowledge and readiness of stakeholders and functional challenges to consumer involvement can aid stakeholder-based approaches to implementing general medical interventions in CMH settings.

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