Cesarean Deliveries and Maternal Weight Retention

Published in: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Volume 17 (October 2017), page 343. doi: 10.1186/s12884-017-1527-x

Posted on RAND.org on October 12, 2017

by Kandice A. Kapinos, Olga Yakusheva, Marianne Weiss

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Cesarean delivery accounts for nearly one-third of all births in the U.S. and contributes to an additional $38 billion in healthcare costs each year. Although Cesarean delivery has a long record of improving maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, increased utilization over time has yielded public health concerns and calls for reductions. Observational evidence suggests Cesarean delivery is associated with increased maternal postpartum weight, which may have significant implications for the obesity epidemic. Previous literature, however, typically does not address selection biases stemming from correlations of pre-pregnancy weight and reproductive health with Cesarean delivery.

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