Resilience Against Depression Disparities (RADD)

A Protocol for a Randomised Comparative Effectiveness Trial for Depression Among Predominantly Low-Income, Racial/Ethnic, Sexual and Gender Minorities

Published in: BMJ Open 9 (2019), e031099. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031099

Posted on RAND.org on January 29, 2020

by Sylvanna Maria Vargas, Ashley Wennerstrom, Nancy Alfaro, Thomas R. Belin, Krystal Griffith, Catherine Haywood, Felica Jones, Mitchell R. Lunn, Diana Meyers, Jeanne Miranda, Juno Obedin-Maliver, Miranda Pollock, Cathy D. Sherbourne, Benjamin Springgate, Olivia K. Sugarman, Emily Rey, Clarence Williams, Pluscedia Williams, Bowen Chung

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Introduction

Depression is the leading cause of adult disability and common among sexual and gender minority (SGM) adults. The current study builds on findings showing the effectiveness of depression quality improvement (QI) and delivery of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) skills provided by community health workers in reducing depression. Depression QI approaches across healthcare and social/community services in safety-net settings have shown improvements in mental wellness, mental health quality of life and depression over 12 months. Further, a randomised study showed improved depression among low-income racial/ethnic minorities enrolled in a CBT-informed resiliency class (Building Resilience and Increasing Community Hope (B-RICH)). The current protocol describes a comparativeness effectiveness study to evaluate whether predominantly low-income, SGM racial/ethnic minority adults randomised to a CBT-informed resiliency class have improvements in depressive symptoms over and above community-engaged QI resources and training only.

Methods and Analysis

The study approached three clusters of four to five programs serving predominantly SGM and racial/ethnic minority communities in the USA: two clusters in Los Angeles, California, and one in New Orleans, Louisiana. Clusters are comprised of one primary care, one mental health and two to three community agencies (eg, faith-based, social services/support, advocacy). All programs received depression QI training. The current study employed a community-partnered participatory research model to adapt the CBT-informed resiliency class, B-RICH+, to SGM communities. Study participants were screened and recruited in person from participating programs, and will complete baseline, 6- and 12-month survey follow-ups. Participants were depressed adults (8-item Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; ≥18 years of age) who provided contact information. Enrolled participants were individually randomised to B-RICH+ or depression QI alone. Primary outcomes are depressive symptoms; secondary outcomes are mental health quality of life, mental wellness and physical health quality of life. Data collection for this study is ongoing.

Ethics and Dissemination

The current study was approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board. Study findings will be disseminated through scientific publications and community conferences.

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