Cover: Identifying HIV PrEP Attributes to Increase PrEP Use Among Different Groups of Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

Identifying HIV PrEP Attributes to Increase PrEP Use Among Different Groups of Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

A Latent Class Analysis of a Discrete Choice Experiment

Published in: AIDS and Behavior (2023). doi: 10.1007/s10461-023-04131-y

Posted on rand.org Nov 6, 2023

by Rahel Dawit, Zachary Predmore, Julia Raifman, Philip A. Chan, Alexandra Skinner, Megan Hoopes, Alexandra Zanowick-Marr, Danielle Le Brazidec, Alexi Almonte, Lorraine T. Dean

Daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective at preventing HIV among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM), although uptake remains suboptimal. By identifying the features of PrEP that appeal to various subgroups of GBMSM, this study aimed to improve PrEP uptake by examining preferences for PrEP use. Adults ≥ 18 years old in six New England states completed an online discrete choice experiment survey. A latent class analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify groups of GBMSM based on four attributes of choices for PrEP (cost, time, side effects, and mode of administration). Multinominal logistic regression was conducted to compare the association between sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics and class memberships. Data from 675 GBMSM were analyzed. A 3-Class model was selected as the best fit model. Class 1 (47.7% of individuals) was identified as having “no specific preferences”. Class 2 (18.5% of individuals) were “Cost- and time-conscious” and were significantly more likely to be older, have prior sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing, have low household income, private insurance, and have extreme concerns about HIV risk than those with no specific preference (Class 1). Finally, Class 3 (34.1% of individuals) were “Side effects-conscious” and were more likely to have low income, private insurance, and have moderate and extreme concerns about HIV risk than those with no specific preference (Class 1). Findings indicate that outreach to GBMSM who have never used PrEP should emphasize low cost and short travel times to increase potential PrEP use.

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