Cover: New Estimates of the Effect of Kassebaum-Kennedy's Group-to-Individual Conversion Provision on Premiums for Individual Health Insurance

New Estimates of the Effect of Kassebaum-Kennedy's Group-to-Individual Conversion Provision on Premiums for Individual Health Insurance

Published 1996

by Jacob Alex Klerman

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Using new tabulations from the Survey of Income and Program Participation and newly released data from the Current Population Survey, this report reexamines the likely effect on insurance premiums in the individual health insurance market of the Health Insurance Act of 1995 (commonly known as "Kassebaum-Kennedy"). A widely cited study by the Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA) estimates that the proposed legislation would increase premiums for those currently buying individual health insurance by over twenty percent. This study estimates a range of effects from 5.5 percent to under one percent. The upper end of the range maintains the HIAA assumptions, but substitutes new tabulations of the figures used in the computation of the estimate. The lower end of the range considers the interaction of the proposed federal legislation and current state insurance regulations.

This report was funded by the Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, as part of RAND's Center for the Study of Employee Health Benefits.

This report is part of the RAND monograph report series. The monograph/report was a product of RAND from 1993 to 2003. RAND monograph/reports presented major research findings that addressed the challenges facing the public and private sectors. They included executive summaries, technical documentation, and synthesis pieces.

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