Cover: Accounting for the Educational Shortfalls of Mothers

Accounting for the Educational Shortfalls of Mothers

Published 1986

by Gus Haggstrom, David E. Kanouse, Peter A. Morrison

Download

Download Free Electronic Document

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 0.9 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 Format Price
Add to Cart Paperback12 pages $20.00

This Note, a reprint of an article that originally appeared in the Journal of Marriage and the Family in February 1986, examines how marriage and parenthood occurring soon after high school affect postsecondary educational pursuits. Young women who form families differ markedly from other teenagers. As high school seniors, the soon-to-be wives and mothers rank low among their classmates on academic aptitude, scholastic performance, and socioeconomic status. Subsequent educational shortfalls are due as much to these preexisting differences as to whatever burdens family formation may impose. Allowing for these differences, the authors find that, while both marriage and parenthood adversely affect postsecondary educational attainments, on average the effects of marriage are more pronounced than those associated with parenthood.

This report is part of the RAND note series. The note was a product of RAND from 1979 to 1993 that reported other outputs of sponsored research for general distribution.

This document and trademark(s) contained herein are protected by law. This representation of RAND intellectual property is provided for noncommercial use only. Unauthorized posting of this publication online is prohibited; linking directly to this product page is encouraged. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research documents for commercial purposes. For information on reprint and reuse permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions.

RAND is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.