State Strategic Planning Under the Bureau of Justice Assistance Formula Grant Program

by Terence Dunworth, Aaron Saiger

Download

Download eBook for Free

FormatFile SizeNotes
PDF file 5.4 MB

Use Adobe Acrobat Reader version 10 or higher for the best experience.

Purchase

Purchase Print Copy

 FormatList Price Price
Add to Cart Paperback141 pages $35.00 $28.00 20% Web Discount

This Note presents a nationwide assessment of the strategic planning that states are required to perform to receive federal aid under the Drug Control and System Improvement Formula Grant Program. The principal findings include: (1) states have embraced strategic planning for drug control, (2) state strategies are not comprehensive in the sense implied by the legislation, (3) several federal mandates on strategy development are sometimes unfulfilled, (4) opposing trends in state organization of drug control planning have emerged, (5) in spite of procedural variations, states' planning decisions have elements in common, (6) states approve of the role played by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), and (7) state and federal perceptions of the program's fiscal constraints differ. The authors recommend that the program's strategy requirement be maintained, that its goals be clarified, that some regulations governing strategic planning be modified, and that the BJA improve its information management and reporting.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation note series. The note was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1979 to 1993 that reported other outputs of sponsored research for general distribution.

Permission is given to duplicate this electronic document for personal use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Copies may not be duplicated for commercial purposes. Unauthorized posting of RAND PDFs to a non-RAND Web site is prohibited. RAND PDFs are protected under copyright law. For information on reprint and linking permissions, please visit the RAND Permissions page.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.