Real wages in Soviet Russia since 1928.

by Janet G. Chapman

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A presentation and analysis of statistical data measuring the changes in cost of living and real wages of Soviet workers since the introduction of the First Five Year Plan in 1928. Although the study is limited to the change in average earnings of nonagricultural and salaried employees, it also considers the "social wage"; i.e., social insurance, cash subsidies, free education and health services, etc. In measuring the change in real wages, the author uses cost-of-living index numbers which measure the changes in average prices paid by workers in all markets of urban USSR. Using reliable Soviet data, index numbers are computed for 1928, 1937, 1940, 1944, 1952 and 1954. Less detailed information is provided for the years since 1954. A presentation and analysis of statistical data measuring the changes in cost of living and real wages of Soviet workers since the introduction of the First Five Year Plan in 1928. Although the study is limited to the change in average earnings of nonagricultural and salaried employees, it also considers the "social wage"; i.e., social insurance, cash subsidies, free education and health services, etc. In measuring the change in real wages, the author uses cost-of-living index numbers which measure the changes in average prices paid by workers in all markets of urban USSR. Using reliable Soviet data, index numbers are computed for 1928, 1937, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952 and 1954. Less detailed information is provided for the years since 1954. 404 pp. Bibliog.

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