Review of an Integrated Library System Installation

by Ann Rice

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RAND started a project to automate its research library in September 1990. The project team, led by a systems analyst, included department heads from the library, representatives from Computer Information Systems (CIS), and the Security Department. The team defined requirements, evaluated and selected a library system, converted data from many sources for the library database, installed, and tested the systems. The system has been used in the library since February 1992 for cataloging of titles, circulation, and on-line searching. It is also used to control the accountability for most classified materials at RAND. This review is an attempt to judge how cost effective the new automated library system is for RAND, and to summarize the time and costs involved. This review was conducted nine months after the library staff began using the new system in their daily operations. The information was gathered from working papers, a survey of the library staff, interviews and a group discussion. This is intended to be primarily forward-looking, to help RAND decide what the next steps should be for the library system, and, further, to help RAND manage similar systems projects in the future.

Originally published in: Proceedings of the Eighth Integrated Online Library Systems Meeting, New York, May 5-6 1993, pp. 105-110.

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