International Alliances and Technology Transfer: Challenging National Foresight?

by Caroline S. Wagner

Purchase Print Copy

 FormatList Price
Add to Cart Paperback15 pages Free

Research shows that international R&D alliances are increasing sharply throughout the industrialized nations. Companies have found utility in seeking alliances with other firms to acquire, co-develop, or jointly market technology-based products. In addition, the trend toward foreign investment in R&D has grown considerably over the past decade. These developments have produced a surge of interest among advanced economies in forecasting future technological development--numerous national reports, lists, and strategies to instruct national-level decisionmaking in both the public and private sectors. Given that the results of R&D--both explicitly contained in patents and publications and tacitly carried in the heads of researchers--flow readily around the world, the process of technical foresight should be reexamined. The author suggests shifting the focus of foresight from a technology-centered approach to a social-benefits approach, with emphasis on science and technology investment that will serve specific national social, economic, and welfare needs.

Originally published in: VDI Technology Center, Proceedings-Report, Forward Thinking, Keys to the Future in Education and Research, June 14-15 1999, Hamburg Germany, pp. 129-143.

This report is part of the RAND Corporation reprint series. The Reprint was a product of the RAND Corporation from 1992 to 2011 that represented previously published journal articles, book chapters, and reports with the permission of the publisher. RAND reprints were formally reviewed in accordance with the publisher's editorial policy and compliant with RAND's rigorous quality assurance standards for quality and objectivity. For select current RAND journal articles, see External Publications.

The RAND Corporation is a nonprofit institution that helps improve policy and decisionmaking through research and analysis. RAND's publications do not necessarily reflect the opinions of its research clients and sponsors.